coheir


Also found in: Legal.
Related to coheir: inheritrix

co·heir

 (kō-âr′)
n.
A joint heir, as to an estate.

coheir

(kəʊˈɛə)
n
(Law) a person who inherits jointly with others
coˈheiress fem n

co•heir

(koʊˈɛər)

n.
a joint heir.
[1350–1400]
co•heir′ship, n.
Translations

coheir

nMiterbe m (→ to +gen); they were coheirs to the fortunesie waren gemeinsame Erben des Vermögens
References in periodicals archive ?
1) Nadjia Fertout-Mouri, (1) Ali Latreche, Coheir Mehdadi, (2) FawziaToumi-Benali and (3) Djilali Bassou
You have desired me and sought me with your whole soul; therefore henceforth you shall be my brother, my friend, the coheir of my glory.
In one instance, Walter Manny and Margaret, widow of Lord Segrave, daughter and coheir of Thomas of Brotherton, earl of Norfolk, were guilty of simply marrying, or in their case, intermarrying, without royal licence at some point in the mid 1350s -- though one must wonder if the king was not also somewhat perturbed at a wealthy titled heiress marrying beneath her station without royal consent.
1332) and coheir to the Badlesmere inheritance in 1335.
In the Hilary term of 1355 the couple started a suit in the Court of Common Pleas against Margery Ros, sister and coheir to Badlesmere, concerning a third of the manor of Bradfield Combust (Suffolk).
But as we advance in the religious life and faith, we shall run the way of God's commandments with expanded hearts and unspeakable sweetness of love; so that never departing from His guidance and persevering in the monastery in His doctrine till death, we may by patience share in the sufferings of Christ, and be found worthy to be coheirs with Him of His kingdom.
60) To Clementia, Countess of Flanders, he wrote sometime after 1100, "Princes should not think that the spouse of God, their mother (if they are Christians) was given to them as a hereditary dominion, but rather entrusted to them by God so that may merit to become her coheirs to honor and defend her.