coinherence

coinherence

(ˌkəʊɪnˈhɪərəns)
n
the act of inhering together
References in periodicals archive ?
The result is that between the local and the universal there is "mutual existence and coinherence." (54) Here we find echoes of communion ecclesiology, which was identified, despite infrequent Baptist use, "as expressing the heart of the nature of the church." (55) What made this interesting intersection possible were the resonances between Catholic communion ecclesiology and Baptist covenantal ecclesiology.
"The Christian God is," writes Kallistos Ware, "not just a unit but a union, not just unity but community." (39) The triunity of God means that God is three equal persons, each one dwelling in the other two through an "unceasing movement of mutual love," a coinherence, or perichoresis.
In other words, the Law of the Cross can be seen as a "coinherence"--in Christ and also in some sense in ourselves (36)--is, embodied in the behavior of living human beings.
To suggest the systematic coinherence of Christology and ecclesiology is nothing new.
The coinherence of the Word and the Spirit within the Trinity became the model for the coinherence" of the biblical letter and spirit, and of the internal and external dimensions of baptism and of other Christian ceremonies and acts.
In short, it is by the very incoherence of our words that we realize the great coinherence of the Word by which we are all made and sustained.
A critical component of his creed is "coinherence," his version of "bearing one another's burdens." In this "interdependence in love, sacrifice is both automatically efficacious and mutually beneficial, from the humblest human favor to that ultimate act of vicarious redemption, the incarnation and crucifixion of Christ" (Bosky 19).
Yet we may need one relationship so unbreakable -- perhaps it has to be an imaginary one -- as to enable us to face the entire coinherence of good and evil, and the thin edge we walk between melting gratitude for the world and absolute resistance to it.
In the terror of the unknown we discover a coinherence that centres in Christ.
For example, we might argue for the coinherence of a prescriptive patriarchal voice and the resistant utterance of its interlocutory alternative in the word "Never." We might further point out the dialogic tension between a locating sequence of"which when where" that threatens to fix the subject within rigid narrative parameters and the disruptive cut of a subject that says "never," refusing "to be sent" away under the reductive logic of naming.