coinherence

coinherence

(ˌkəʊɪnˈhɪərəns)
n
the act of inhering together
References in periodicals archive ?
Lewis adopted Charles Williams's ideas about coinherence and substitution in Till We Have Faces and, most poignantly, in A Grief Observed and his letters about his wife Joy Davidman's cancer, miraculous remission, and eventual death.
39) The triunity of God means that God is three equal persons, each one dwelling in the other two through an "unceasing movement of mutual love," a coinherence, or perichoresis.
To suggest the systematic coinherence of Christology and ecclesiology is nothing new.
The coinherence of the Word and the Spirit within the Trinity became the model for the coinherence" of the biblical letter and spirit, and of the internal and external dimensions of baptism and of other Christian ceremonies and acts.
In short, it is by the very incoherence of our words that we realize the great coinherence of the Word by which we are all made and sustained.
The mutual coinherence, however, of the paschal mystery of Christ and of the mystery of Pentecost, as these were manifested in the earthly life of Christ, is continuously extended from the sacramental experience in the life of the church to all and to each one of the believers.
Yet we may need one relationship so unbreakable -- perhaps it has to be an imaginary one -- as to enable us to face the entire coinherence of good and evil, and the thin edge we walk between melting gratitude for the world and absolute resistance to it.
In the terror of the unknown we discover a coinherence that centres in Christ.
For example, we might argue for the coinherence of a prescriptive patriarchal voice and the resistant utterance of its interlocutory alternative in the word "Never.
Can Frei's conceptions of identity, both individual and social, adequately accommodate the complexities of personal and community boundaries, with all the coinherence, ambivalence, and contradiction that are actually present?
Drawing primarily on three major works by Williams--He Came Down From Heaven, The Descent of the Dove, and The Image of the City--Scott uses Williams's assertion that coinherence and substitution not only are attributes of the divine life of the Trinitarian God, but they also are essential marks of our existence as human beings.