collaborator


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col·lab·o·rate

 (kə-lăb′ə-rāt′)
intr.v. col·lab·o·rat·ed, col·lab·o·rat·ing, col·lab·o·rates
1. To work together, especially in a joint intellectual effort.
2. To cooperate treasonably, as with an enemy occupation force in one's country.

[Late Latin collabōrāre, collabōrāt- : Latin com-, com- + Latin labōrāre, to work (from labor, toil).]

col·lab′o·ra′tion n.
col·lab′o·ra′tive adj.
col·lab′o·ra′tor n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.collaborator - someone who assists in a plotcollaborator - someone who assists in a plot  
accessary, accessory - someone who helps another person commit a crime
2.collaborator - someone who collaborates with an enemy occupying forcecollaborator - someone who collaborates with an enemy occupying force
traitor, treasonist - someone who betrays his country by committing treason
3.collaborator - an associate in an activity or endeavor or sphere of common interest; "the musician and the librettist were collaborators"; "sexual partners"
associate - a person who joins with others in some activity or endeavor; "he had to consult his associate before continuing"
bridge partner - one of a pair of bridge players who are on the same side of the game
dancing partner - one of a pair of people who dance together
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

collaborator

noun
1. co-worker, partner, colleague, associate, team-mate, confederate My wife was an important collaborator on the novel.
2. traitor, turncoat, quisling, collaborationist, fraternizer Two alleged collaborators were shot dead by masked activists.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
مُتَعاوِن
kolaborantspolupracovník
kollaboratørmedarbejdersamarbejdspartner
ellenséggel együttmûködõkollaboránsközremûködõ
samstarfsmaîur
spolupracovník
hainişbirliği yapan

collaborator

[kəˈlæbəreɪtəʳ] Ncolaborador(a) m/f (Pol) → colaboracionista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

collaborator

[kəˈlæbəreɪtər] n
(= co-worker) → collaborateur/trice m/f
(pejorative) (secret)collaborateur/trice m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

collaborator

n
Mitarbeiter(in) m(f)
(with enemy) → Kollaborateur(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

collaborator

[kəˈlæbəˌreɪtəʳ] n (on project) → collaboratore/trice (pej) (with enemy) → collaborazionista m/f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

collaborate

(kəˈlӕbəreit) verb
1. to work together (with someone) on a piece of work. He and his brother collaborated on a book about aeroplanes.
2. to work along (with someone) to betray secrets etc. He was known to have collaborated with the enemy.
colˌlaboˈration noun
colˈlaborator noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The effect produced by my news convinced me that his affection for his young collaborator was cordial enough, and this emboldened me to make reply as I did.
(We observe the same thing in children to-day, whose usage in this particular is a striking and beautiful instance of the law that the infancy of individuals reproduces the methods and stages of development characterizing the infancy of races.) In the work of these primitive scribes all the punctuation is found, by the modern investigator with his optical instruments and chemical tests, to have been inserted by the writers' ingenious and serviceable collaborator, the common house-fly -- Musca maledicta .
His energy and interest must soon have won him the opportunity to show his skill as actor and also reviser and collaborator in play-writing, then as independent author; and after the first few years of slow progress his rise was rapid.
I like George, but I cannot permit him to pose in any way as my collaborator. George has old-fashioned ideas.
It was called simply The Life-Book of Captain Jim, and on the title page the names of Owen Ford and James Boyd were printed as collaborators. The frontispiece was a photograph of Captain Jim himself, standing at the door of the lighthouse, looking across the gulf.
I daresay we sighed, but never were collaborators more prepared for rejection, and though my mother might look wistfully at the scorned manuscript at times and murmur,
In fact, the youth looked upon the playwright as a great author, and it was to Sebastien that du Bruel said, the day after a first representation of a vaudeville produced, like all vaudevilles, by three collaborators, "The audience preferred the scenes written by two."
He was liked by his collaborators on account of his carefulness; the man with brains, sure of being understood, could cross his arms and feel that his ideas would be well rendered.
Collaborators came in various shades !-- -- Filipinos hate enemy collaborators for blighting history.
"The leader of the mission contacted a collaborator in Turkey to secure a safe location in case force had to be used return the victim.
project managers can remove a collaborator whenever theyd like.
VIP room gaming promoters and collaborator currently participate in the promotion of five major luxury VIP gaming facilities in Macau, China.

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