collagen


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col·la·gen

 (kŏl′ə-jən)
n.
1. Any of a class of extracellular proteins that are composed of three coiled polypeptide chains, form strong fibers, and are the main constituents of cartilage, bone, and other connective tissues in animals.
2. Material composed principally of collagen proteins. Collagen is converted into gelatin when boiled in water.

[Greek kolla, glue + -gen.]

col′la·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk), col·lag′e·nous (kə-lăj′ə-nəs) adj.

collagen

(ˈkɒlədʒən)
n
(Biochemistry) a fibrous scleroprotein of connective tissue and bones that is rich in glycine and proline and yields gelatine on boiling
[C19: from Greek kolla glue + -gen]
collagenic, collagenous adj

col•la•gen

(ˈkɒl ə dʒən)

n.
a strongly fibrous protein that is abundant in bone, tendons, cartilage, and connective tissue, yielding gelatin when denatured by boiling.
[1860–65; < Greek kólla glue + -gen]
col•lag•e•nous (kəˈlædʒ ə nəs) adj.

col·la·gen

(kŏl′ə-jən)
The tough, fibrous protein found in bone, cartilage, skin, and other connective tissue. Collagen provides these body structures with the ability to withstand forces that stretch or lengthen them.

collagen

A fibrous protein, the chief protein constituent of connective tissue.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.collagen - a fibrous scleroprotein in bone and cartilage and tendon and other connective tissue; yields gelatin on boiling
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
connective tissue - tissue of mesodermal origin consisting of e.g. collagen fibroblasts and fatty cells; supports organs and fills spaces between them and forms tendons and ligaments
cartilage, gristle - tough elastic tissue; mostly converted to bone in adults
sinew, tendon - a cord or band of inelastic tissue connecting a muscle with its bony attachment
albuminoid, scleroprotein - a simple protein found in horny and cartilaginous tissues and in the lens of the eye
Translations
kolagen
collageen

collagen

[ˈkɒlədzən] Ncolágeno m

collagen

[ˈkɒlədʒən] ncollagène m

collagen

[ˈkɒlədʒən] ncollageno

col·la·gen

n. colágeno, principal proteína de sostén del tejido conectivo de la piel, huesos, tendones y cartílagos.

collagen

n colágeno
References in periodicals archive ?
Almost 30% of the body's protein comprises collagen. It is one of the crucial building blocks of the human body.
[USPRwire, Thu Aug 22 2019] Cartino Collagen also known as fish collagen is an artificially fabricated, irregular fibrous material consisting of numerous polypeptide chains of protein folded in a triple helical conformation.
[ClickPress, Thu Aug 22 2019] Cartino Collagen also known as fish collagen is an artificially fabricated, irregular fibrous material consisting of numerous polypeptide chains of protein folded in a triple helical conformation.
Collagen has a lot of different types, and among these, the most common and largest that are found in the body are Types I (skin, tendons, ligaments, and bone), II (cartilage), and III (skin, blood vessels, and muscle).
Clinical trials show that oral use of a collagen peptide improves skin elasticity by an average of 7% 3 and reduces the depth of eye wrinkles by 20%.
With age, the body produces lower-quality collagen, which causes the skin to become less firm and supple.
Co-culture KMandFM under 3.4 kPa pressure enhanced typeIcollagen and type III collagen mRNA expression and protein secretion from KM.
He has been taking medications for his poor health condition until he discovered the Fountain of Youth Collagen.
These capsules combine hydrolysed pure marine collagen with nutrients to maintain skin health, including vitamin C, zinc, copper, riboflavin, niacin and biotin.
The small team of 12 is the first commercial manufacturer of jellyfish collagen for research purposes and for the medical, biotech and pharmaceutical markets in Europe.
It is used in the research, medical, biotech and pharmaceutical world to grow new human tissue and organs and to make specialist collagen dressings to attract new skin cells to wound sites.