collagen

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col·la·gen

 (kŏl′ə-jən)
n.
1. Any of a class of extracellular proteins that are composed of three coiled polypeptide chains, form strong fibers, and are the main constituents of cartilage, bone, and other connective tissues in animals.
2. Material composed principally of collagen proteins. Collagen is converted into gelatin when boiled in water.

[Greek kolla, glue + -gen.]

col′la·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk), col·lag′e·nous (kə-lăj′ə-nəs) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

collagen

(ˈkɒlədʒən)
n
(Biochemistry) a fibrous scleroprotein of connective tissue and bones that is rich in glycine and proline and yields gelatine on boiling
[C19: from Greek kolla glue + -gen]
collagenic, collagenous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

col•la•gen

(ˈkɒl ə dʒən)

n.
a strongly fibrous protein that is abundant in bone, tendons, cartilage, and connective tissue, yielding gelatin when denatured by boiling.
[1860–65; < Greek kólla glue + -gen]
col•lag•e•nous (kəˈlædʒ ə nəs) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

col·la·gen

(kŏl′ə-jən)
The tough, fibrous protein found in bone, cartilage, skin, and other connective tissue. Collagen provides these body structures with the ability to withstand forces that stretch or lengthen them.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

collagen

A fibrous protein, the chief protein constituent of connective tissue.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.collagen - a fibrous scleroprotein in bone and cartilage and tendon and other connective tissue; yields gelatin on boiling
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
connective tissue - tissue of mesodermal origin consisting of e.g. collagen fibroblasts and fatty cells; supports organs and fills spaces between them and forms tendons and ligaments
cartilage, gristle - tough elastic tissue; mostly converted to bone in adults
sinew, tendon - a cord or band of inelastic tissue connecting a muscle with its bony attachment
albuminoid, scleroprotein - a simple protein found in horny and cartilaginous tissues and in the lens of the eye
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
kolagen
collageen

collagen

[ˈkɒlədzən] Ncolágeno m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

collagen

[ˈkɒlədʒən] ncollagène m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

collagen

[ˈkɒlədʒən] ncollageno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

col·la·gen

n. colágeno, principal proteína de sostén del tejido conectivo de la piel, huesos, tendones y cartílagos.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

collagen

n colágeno
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(18) placed 1 mg morphine-impregnated microfibrillar collagen sponge over the intact dural sac during single level posterior lumbar laminectomy and instrumented fusion operation and found that postoperative morphine consumption is lower than the control group during 24 h.
The collagen sponge was initially developed to protect the brain beneath the retractor [20].
Porous collagen sponge wound dressings: In vivo and in vitro studies.
MSCs were seeded on TCP or a collagen sponge. The collagen sponge was prepared from a cross reaction of chondroitin-6-sulfate and type I collagen [43].
Performing crestal sinus floor elevation with collagen sponge simultaneously with implant placement may hesitate in endosinus bone gain limited to the height of the implant apex, because the Schneiderian membrane might collapse on it [41], as demonstrated by the mesial implant.
Porous collagen sponge has a desirable ultrastructure, biocompatibility, and safety and may be commercially available at an economic cost.
Furthermore, CNTs have shown promising biochemical properties, such as strong cell adhesion in multiwall carbon nanotube-coated collagen sponge and protein absorption [16-18].
In the paper "Collagen Sponge Functionalized with Chimeric Anti-BMP-2 Monoclonal Antibody Mediates Repair of Critical-Size Mandibular Continuity Defects in a Nonhuman Primate Model," Y.
There are two BMPs clinically available: BMP-7 (also known as osteogenic protein-1 or OP-1) supplied by Stryker UK, which uses a bovine collagen carrier in granular form (OP-1 Putty in the US and Osigraft [R] in the UK), and rhBMP-2 supplied by Wyeth Research Ltd, which uses a collagen sponge carrier (InFUSE in the US and InductOs in the UK).
In this study, the easy regulatory process was performed; the biocompatible collagen sponge was immersed in an aqueous dispersion of nano-[beta]-TCP using zwitterionic surfactants, for suppressing of nanosize particle agglutination [22, 23].
The transplant contained the following elements: homogenized hemostatic collagen sponge dispersed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and Chinchilla rabbit with blood plasma free of cells (group 1) or platelet-rich rabbit plasma (PRP) (groups 2-5).

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