collective unconscious


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Related to collective unconscious: Carl Jung

collective unconscious

n.
In Jungian psychology, a part of the unconscious mind, shared by a society, a people, or all humankind, that is the product of ancestral experience.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

collective unconscious

n
(Psychology) (in Jungian psychological theory) a part of the unconscious mind incorporating patterns of memories, instincts, and experiences common to all mankind. These patterns are inherited, may be arranged into archetypes, and are observable through their effects on dreams, behaviour, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

collec′tive uncon′scious


n.
(in Jungian psychology) inborn unconscious psychic material common to humankind, accumulated by the experience of all preceding generations.
Compare archetype (def. 2).
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

collective unconscious

In the psychology of Carl Jung, an area of the unconscious mind that all members of a society share, including instincts and religious feelings.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
In Carl Jung's magnum opus 'Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious,' one of the greatest psychologists of the modern era discussed the presence of 'archaic and mythological thought-forms' common across cultures and time.
The Prime Minister added that recent studies in social psychology now suggest that the scars and oppression of slavery are lodged - generations after - in their Collective Unconscious i.e.
He introduced the concepts of extraversion and introversion, and terms such as complex, archetype, individuation, and the collective unconscious. He stressed the primacy of finding meaning in our lives.
It is blood, toil and tears for this is what they have experienced either through a firsthand exposure to punitive violence by the Indian forces in Kashmir or through harrowing ancestral tales of such state sponsored atrocities, that they have grown up listening to, and which now defines their collective unconscious. At a tender age, these children realize that freedom is not guaranteed, it is fought for, claimed over.
The longer an organization operates successfully in a certain way, the more deeply embedded those norms and beliefs become in the collective unconscious and, consequently, the more difficult they are to change when the operating context evolves around them.
To use the principles of Carl Jung, it is there in our collective unconscious. It is there in us.
They redefine the idea of fathering by re-envisioning a father's inherent responsibilities and the raising of his child and apply Carl Jung's idea of the collective unconscious to their ideas about fathering, examining how fathering has undergone different transformations due to societal changes, culture, faith, gender identity, and gender roles; the captain, educator, protector, nurturer, and jester archetypes; and the driving forces of temperament, relational dynamics, time orientation, emotional intelligence, and worldview and their impact on fatherhood archetypes.
The latter is divided into the personal unconscious and the collective unconscious. Both are present in every human being.
In exploring the human psyche, it is important that we take a look at how, not only the collective mentality is present, but also how the collective unconscious is a part of our human psyche.
"There could be a collective unconscious that makes us associate to one country due to historical reasons; France is a good example since Lebanon was under the French mandate and we still feel the French influence in our identity, everyday life and language," clinical psychologist, Sarah-Joe Chamate told Gulf News .
Evening." In contrast to recent visually-charged productions, for example South African artist William Kentridge's sensational Wozzeck in Salzburg a few months earlier, the Canadian director's stage is empty: no video to evoke possible connections to past or future, collective unconscious, id or superego, iconography--just the gripping presence of extraordinary singers that Carsen directs with penetrating precision.
Its unique appearance, resembling a saucer mounted on a sapphire dome, became indelibly ingrained in the collective unconscious.