collegialism

collegialism

(kəˈliːdʒɪəlɪzəm)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the theory that the church's highest authority is its collective membership

collegialism

the belief that the church as an organization is independent of and equal to the state, with its highest authority lying in its collective membership.
See also: Church
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References in periodicals archive ?
Don't expect Powell to veer from gradualism just yet, or abandon collegialism, though observers will pay close attention to the economic projections and dot plot to see where his policy peers are potentially leaning in terms of 3 or 4 hikes this year.
(113) See Kelman, supra note 16, at 298 ("I admire the collegialism of Justice Harlan more than the soloism of Justice Black."); Larsen, supra note 16, at 477 ("I therefore suggest that the Harlan approach is a healthy alternative to the perpetual dissenter.").
In this context, arguments to preserve academic freedom, collegialism, and institutional autonomy risk being perceived by the public as self-serving claims to professional privileges.
She has published widely on various higher education issues including government policy and policy-making related to universities, the commodification of academic research, and the erosion of university autonomy, democracy, and collegialism. She is also co-editor of Academic Callings: The University We Have Had, Now Have, and Could Have and co-founder and Board member of the University of Regina Faculty of Arts Community Research Unit.
Pietism was to Baumgarten what Arminianism was to Warburton and Vernet, but Sorkin also traces the influence of Dutch Collegialism and English moderatism on Baumgarten's defense of "the true middle way"--a way that included appeals to natural law, natural religion, and revelation and scripture.
And it is reflected in the many new managerial practices that are being employed by university administrators--ranging from greater secrecy in the running of institutional affairs, to various forms of pseudo-consultation, to the increased use of performance indicators and merit pay to control and motivate academic workers--all of which erode the collegialism and institutional democracy that have been the hallmarks of university governance.
For example, the more universities get involved in research for business, the more they have to operate as businesses: the more secrecy they require, the more bureaucracy they require, and the less democracy and collegialism they can tolerate.
In such circumstances, self-evaluation followed by an inquisitorial peer review encourages retrenchment rather than responsiveness: cloisterism rather than new collegialism (Harvey, 1995).
However, our analysis led us to enter a note of caution in respect of claims that a transition is occurring from 'collegialism' to 'managerialism' (Jary and Parker 1995; Scott and Watson 1994).

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