colloquial


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col·lo·qui·al

 (kə-lō′kwē-əl)
adj.
1. Characteristic of or appropriate to the spoken language or to writing that seeks the effect of speech; informal.
2. Relating to conversation; conversational.

[From colloquy.]

col·lo′qui·al n.
col·lo′qui·al·ly adv.
col·lo′qui·al·ness n.

colloquial

(kəˈləʊkwɪəl)
adj
1. (Linguistics) of or relating to conversation
2. (Linguistics) denoting or characterized by informal or conversational idiom or vocabulary. Compare informal
colˈloquially adv
colˈloquialness n

col•lo•qui•al

(kəˈloʊ kwi əl)

adj.
1. characteristic of or suitable to ordinary or familiar conversation or writing rather than formal speech or writing; informal.
2. involving or using conversation.
[1745–55; colloquy + -al1]
col•lo′qui•al•ly, adv.
col•lo′qui•al•ness, col•lo`qui•al′i•ty, n.
syn: colloquial, conversational, informal refer to types of speech or to usages that are not on a formal level. colloquial is often mistakenly used with a connotation of disapproval, as if it meant “vulgar” or “bad” or “incorrect” usage, whereas it merely describes a casual or familiar style used in speaking and writing: colloquial expressions. conversational refers to a style used in the oral exchange of ideas, opinions, etc.: The newsletter was written in an easy conversational style. informal means without formality, without strict attention to set forms, unceremonious; it describes the ordinary, everyday language of cultivated speakers: informal English.

colloquial

Used to describe words or expressions that are found in everyday speech.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.colloquial - characteristic of informal spoken language or conversation; "wrote her letters in a colloquial style"; "the broken syntax and casual enunciation of conversational English"
informal - used of spoken and written language

colloquial

adjective informal, familiar, everyday, vernacular, conversational, demotic, idiomatic He converses in colloquial Japanese as easily as in English.

colloquial

adjective
In the style of conversation:
Translations
عامّي، دارِج
hovorový
daglidags-dagligdagshverdags-kollokvialtalesprogs-
kötetlen társalgási nyelvi
talmáls-
paprastai sakantšnekamosios kalbõsšnekamosios kalbos žodis/posakis
sarunu-
konuşma diline ait

colloquial

[kəˈləʊkwɪəl] ADJcoloquial, familiar

colloquial

[kəˈləʊkwiəl] adj [language, speech] → familier/ière; [term, sense] → familier/ière; [English] → parlé(e)

colloquial

colloquial

[kəˈləʊkwɪəl] adj (word, phrase) → familiare; (style) → colloquiale

colloquial

(kəˈləukwiəl) adjective
of or used in everyday informal, especially spoken, language. a colloquial expression.
colˈloquially adverb
colˈloquialism noun
an expression used in colloquial language.
References in classic literature ?
The instant the words escaped his lips he recovered himself, and glided off into his ordinary colloquial channels.
The first part commences with an apology for his colloquial style; he is, as he has always been, the enemy of rhetoric, and knows of no rhetoric but truth; he will not falsify his character by making a speech.
For the iambic is, of all measures, the most colloquial: we see it in the fact that conversational speech runs into iambic lines more frequently than into any other kind of verse; rarely into hexameters, and only when we drop the colloquial intonation.
As they approached the Way-lee-way, however, the communicative old chief met with another and a very different occasion to exert his colloquial powers.
When no such regular minister offered, a kind of colloquial prayer or two was made by some of the more gifted members, and a sermon was usually read, from Sterne, by Mr.
Stables, which bids fair to outshine the old one, on which he has so long rested his colloquial reputation.
His rhetoric there, and in certain of his historical studies, had a sort of luminous richness, without losing its colloquial ease.
Having picked up a few of our most familiar colloquial expressions, he scattered them about over his conversation whenever they happened to occur to him, turning them, in his high relish for their sound and his general ignorance of their sense, into compound words and repetitions of his own, and always running them into each other, as if they consisted of one long syllable.
Indignation, the sense of moral insecurity engendered by such a treacherous proceeding joined to the immediate apprehension of a broken neck, would, in the colloquial phrase, put him in a state.
Strangely enough, in both cases I took to that sort of thing in circumstances in which I did not ex- pect, in colloquial phrase, "to come out of it.
Perceiving the necessity of doing something to disarm this female Cerberus, before his own purpose could be accomplished, the Doctor, reluctant as he was to encounter her tongue, found himself compelled to invite a colloquial communication.
No one had interfered in the dispute, which was beyond the French colloquial powers of Edward Dorrit, Esquire, and scarcely within the province of the ladies.