colocynth

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col·o·cynth

 (kŏl′ə-sĭnth′)
n.
1. A tendril-bearing Old World vine (Citrullus colocynthis) bearing yellowish, green-mottled fruits the size of small lemons.
2. The fruit of this plant, whose dried, bitter, spongy pulp is a very strong laxative. In both senses also called bitter apple.

[Latin colocynthis, from Greek kolokunthis, from kolokunthē, round gourd.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

colocynth

(ˈkɒləsɪnθ)
n
1. (Plants) a cucurbitaceous climbing plant, Citrullus colocynthis, of the Mediterranean region and Asia, having bitter-tasting fruit
2. (Pharmacology) the dried fruit pulp of this plant, used as a strong purgative
German name: bitter apple
[C17: from Latin colocynthis, from Greek kolokunthis, from kolokunthē gourd, of obscure origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

col•o•cynth

(ˈkɒl ə sɪnθ)

n.
1. Also called bitter apple. a Mediterranean and S Asian plant, Citrullus colocynthis, of the gourd family, bearing a round, yellow or green fruit with a bitter pulp.
2. a drug derived from the pulp of the fruit, used as a purgative.
[1555–65; < Latin colocynthis < Greek kolokynthís, variant of kolókyntha bitter gourd]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
"The bitter is indeed to come," said the countess; "and such bitter that colocynth is sweet and oleander toothsome in comparison.
Phytochemical analysis of some chemical metabolites of Colocynth plant (Citrullus colocynths L.) and its activities as antimicrobial and antiplasmodial.
Thereupon two men from Yemen approached and suggested that the juice of colocynths, rubbed into the man's foot-soles, might not make the affliction go away but it might in any case halt the aggravation of the disease.