colonel


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

colonel

a commissioned officer in the armed forces
Not to be confused with:
kernel – the central, softer part within a hard shell of a nut or fruit stone; the whole seed of grain such as wheat or corn: Popcorn is made from the kernel of corn.; the nucleus or essential part of anything: There was a kernel of truth in everything she said.

colo·nel

 (kûr′nəl)
n.
1.
a. A commissioned rank in the US Army, Air Force, or Marine Corps that is above lieutenant colonel and below brigadier general.
b. One who holds this rank or a similar rank in another military organization.
2. An honorary nonmilitary title awarded by some states of the United States.

[Alteration of obsolete coronel, from French, from Old Italian colonello, from diminutive of colonna, column of soldiers, from Latin columna, column; see kel- in Indo-European roots.]

colo′nel·cy, colo′nel·ship′ n.

colonel

(ˈkɜːnəl)
n
(Military) an officer of land or air forces junior to a brigadier but senior to a lieutenant colonel
[C16: via Old French, from Old Italian colonnello column of soldiers, from colonna column]
ˈcolonelcy, ˈcolonelˌship n

colo•nel

(ˈkɜr nl)

n.
1. an officer in the U.S. Army, Air Force, or Marine Corps ranking above lieutenant colonel.
2. a commissioned officer of similar rank in other nations.
3. Southern U.S.
a. an honorary title bestowed by some states, esp. on visiting dignitaries.
b. (formerly) a title of respect for an elderly man.
[1540–50; < Middle French < Italian colon(n)ello=colonn(a) column + -ello < Latin -ellus diminutive suffix; so named because such an officer orig. headed the first column or company of a regiment]
colo′nel•cy, n.
pron: colonel (ˈkɜr nl) with its medial l pronounced as (r), illustrates one source for the apparent vagaries of English spelling: divergence between a word's orthographic development and its established pronunciation. In this case, English borrowed from French two variant forms of the same word, one pronounced with medial and final (l), and a second reflecting dissimilation of the first (l) to (r). After a period of competition, the dissimilated form triumphed in pronunciation, while the spelling colonel became the orthographic standard.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.colonel - a commissioned military officer in the United States Army or Air Force or Marines who ranks above a lieutenant colonel and below a brigadier generalcolonel - a commissioned military officer in the United States Army or Air Force or Marines who ranks above a lieutenant colonel and below a brigadier general
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
commissioned military officer - a commissioned officer in the Army or Air Force or Marine Corps
lieutenant colonel, light colonel - a commissioned officer in the United States Army or Air Force or Marines holding a rank above major and below colonel
Translations
عَقيدعَقِيد
plukovník
oberst
eversti
pukovnik
ezredes
ofursti
大佐
육군 대령
pulkininkas
pulkvedis
plukovník
polkovnik
överste
พันเอก
đại tá

colonel

[ˈkɜːnl] Ncoronel m

colonel

[ˈkɜːrnəl] ncolonel m

colonel

nOberst m; (as address) → Herr Oberst

colonel

[ˈkɜːnl] ncolonnello

colonel

(ˈkəːnl) noun
(often abbreviated to Col . when written) an army officer in charge of a regiment.

colonel

عَقِيد plukovník oberst Oberst συνταγματάρχης coronel eversti colonel pukovnik colonnello 大佐 육군 대령 kolonel oberst pułkownik coronel полковник överste พันเอก albay đại tá 陆军上校
References in classic literature ?
Franklin, that your father wouldn't have touched the Colonel with a pair of tongs
The colonel had to resort to all kinds of stratagems to keep his slaves out of the garden.
The colonel rose abruptly from his bed and began to dress.
I scarcely know how to describe this person, who, to my simple eyes, had the appearance of a colonel of the late Royal Guards, or, at least, of an attache of one of the northern legations.
When Lady Durgan, widow of the late Sir John Durgan, arrived in their station, and after a short time had been proposed to by every single man at mess, she put the public sentiment very neatly when she explained that they were all so nice that unless she could marry them all, including the colonel and some majors already married, she was not going to content herself with one hussar.
Colonel Pyncheon, the claimant, as we gather from whatever traits of him are preserved, was characterized by an iron energy of purpose.
said the colonel in a bored voice, puckering up his face as if driving off a troublesome fly.
Kim looked up hurriedly and saw Colonel Creighton in tennis- flannels.
She was remarkably quick in the discovery of attachments, and had enjoyed the advantage of raising the blushes and the vanity of many a young lady by insinuations of her power over such a young man; and this kind of discernment enabled her soon after her arrival at Barton decisively to pronounce that Colonel Brandon was very much in love with Marianne Dashwood.
When we find him again, his mustachios and the title of Colonel on his card are the only relics of his military profession.
He jerked and wrenched savagely at his bridle, stop- ping the hard-breathing animal with a furious pull near the colonel of the regiment.
On Tuesday evening I received telegrams from both Colonel Ross, the owner of the horse, and from Inspector Gregory, who is looking after the case, inviting my cooperation.