colonist


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Related to colonist: colonialist

col·o·nist

 (kŏl′ə-nĭst)
n.
1. An original settler or founder of a colony.
2. An inhabitant of a colony.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

colonist

(ˈkɒlənɪst)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who settles or colonizes an area
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an inhabitant or member of a colony
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

col•o•nist

(ˈkɒl ə nɪst)

n.
1. an inhabitant of a colony.
2. a member of a colonizing expedition.
[1695–1705, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.colonist - a person who settles in a new colony or moves into new countrycolonist - a person who settles in a new colony or moves into new country
migrant, migrator - traveler who moves from one region or country to another
Pilgrim Father, Pilgrim - one of the colonists from England who sailed to America on the Mayflower and founded the colony of Plymouth in New England in 1620
pioneer - one the first colonists or settlers in a new territory; "they went west as pioneers with only the possessions they could carry with them"
sourdough - a settler or prospector (especially in western United States or northwest Canada and Alaska)
homesteader, nester, squatter - someone who settles lawfully on government land with the intent to acquire title to it
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

colonist

noun settler, immigrant, pioneer, colonial, homesteader (U.S.), colonizer, frontiersman The apple was brought over here by the colonists when they came.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
مُستَعْمِر، مُستَوْطِن
kolonistaosadník
kolonistnybygger
gyarmatos
landnemi; nÿlendubúi
sömürgecisömürgede oturan kimse

colonist

[ˈkɒlənɪst] N (= pioneer) → colonizador(a) m/f; (= inhabitant) → colono m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

colonist

[ˈkɒlənɪst] ncolon m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

colonist

nKolonist(in) m(f), → Siedler(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

colonist

[ˈkɒlənɪst] ncolonizzatore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

colony

(ˈkoləni) plural ˈcolonies noun
1. (a group of people who form) a settlement in one country etc which is under the rule of another country. France used to have many colonies in Africa.
2. a group of people having the same interests, living close together. a colony of artists.
3. a collection of animals, birds etc, of one type, living together. a colony of gulls.
coˈlonial (-ˈlou-) adjective
Britain was formerly a colonial power.
coˈlonialism noun
coˈlonialist noun
and adjective.
ˈcolonize, ˈcolonise verb
to establish a colony in (a place). The English colonized New England in 1620.
ˈcolonist noun
ˌcoloniˈzation, ˌcoloniˈsation noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The hardy colonist, and the trained European who fought at his side, frequently expended months in struggling against the rapids of the streams, or in effecting the rugged passes of the mountains, in quest of an opportunity to exhibit their courage in a more martial conflict.
In this mortifying abasement, the colonists, though innocent of her imbecility, and too humble to be the agents of her blunders, were but the natural participators.
And blast you all!" he wound up, looking round the room and snapping his fingers once with a loud snap, "blast you every one, from the judge in his wig, to the colonist a stirring up the dust, I'll show a better gentleman than the whole kit on you put together!"
He had not the rich complexion of the typical colonist, being indeed peculiarly pale, but it appeared that he had been confined to his berth for the greater part of the voyage, while his prematurely gray hair was sufficient proof that the rigors of bush life had at last undermined an originally tough constitution.
He was one of those aboriginals of Canada who had partially conformed to the habits of civilization and the doctrines of Christianity, under the influence of the French colonists and the Catholic priests; who seem generally to have been more successful in conciliating, taming, and converting the savages, than their English and Protestant rivals.
But I am forgetting the Jaffa Colonists. At Jaffa we had taken on board some forty members of a very celebrated community.
He was fighting in their defense—he knew that the mild principles of this little nation of practical Christians would be disregarded by their subtle and malignant enemies; and he felt the in jury the more deeply because he saw that the avowed object of the colonists, in withholding their succors, would only have a tendency to expose his command, without preserving the peace.
The mention of this holy man suggested to Grandfather the propriety of giving a brief sketch of the history of the Indians, so far as they were connected with the English colonists.
When Atlantis, with all her mighty cities and her cultivated fields and her great commerce and culture and riches sank into the sea long ages since, she took with her all but a handful of her colonists working the vast gold mines of Central Africa.
Although there will always be a struggle for life between the individuals of the species, however few, already occupying any pond, yet as the number of kinds is small, compared with those on the land, the competition will probably be less severe between aquatic than between terrestrial species; consequently an intruder from the waters of a foreign country, would have a better chance of seizing on a place, than in the case of terrestrial colonists. We should, also, remember that some, perhaps many, fresh-water productions are low in the scale of nature, and that we have reason to believe that such low beings change or become modified less quickly than the high; and this will give longer time than the average for the migration of the same aquatic species.
These valleys, which so long presented an insuperable barrier to the attempts of the most enterprising of the colonists to reach the interior, are most remarkable.
Till these evil times, however, such allegiance had been merely nominal, and the colonists had ruled themselves, enjoying far more freedom than is even yet the privilege of the native subjects of Great Britain.