coloration


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Related to coloration: colouration

col·or·a·tion

 (kŭl′ə-rā′shən)
n.
1. Arrangement of colors.
2. The sum of the beliefs or principles of a person, group, or institution.

coloration

(ˌkʌləˈreɪʃən) or

colouration

n
1. arrangement of colour and tones; colouring
2. (Zoology) the colouring or markings of insects, birds, etc. See also apatetic, aposematic, cryptic
3. (Electronics) unwanted extraneous variations in the frequency response of a loudspeaker or listening environment

col•or•a•tion

(ˌkʌl əˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
appearance with regard to color; arrangement or use of colors; coloring: bold coloration.
[1605–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coloration - the timbre of a musical sound; "the recording fails to capture the true color of the original music"
timbre, tone, quality, timber - (music) the distinctive property of a complex sound (a voice or noise or musical sound); "the timbre of her soprano was rich and lovely"; "the muffled tones of the broken bell summoned them to meet"
2.coloration - appearance with regard to color; "her healthy coloration"
color, coloring, colouring, colour - a visual attribute of things that results from the light they emit or transmit or reflect; "a white color is made up of many different wavelengths of light"
hair coloring - coloring of the hair; "her hair-coloring was unusual: a very pale gold"
pigmentation - coloration of living tissues by pigment
depigmentation - absence or loss of pigmentation (or less than normal pigmentation) in the skin or hair
protective coloration - coloration making an organism less visible or attractive to predators
3.coloration - choice and use of colors (as by an artist)
selection, choice, option, pick - the act of choosing or selecting; "your choice of colors was unfortunate"; "you can take your pick"
Translations

coloration

[ˌkʌləˈreɪʃən] Ncolorido m, colores mpl, coloración f

coloration

nFärbung f

coloration

[ˌkʌləˈreɪʃn] ncolorazione f

coloration

n. coloración.
References in classic literature ?
Curiosity prompted him to tarry a moment, and in that moment his quick eyes caught the unfamiliar coloration of the clothing of the two Swedes behind a bush not far from him.
Caption(s): New yarn options will allow for greater coloration and styling effects.
Juvenile great whites look a little like makos but have more girth and different coloration, with triangular, serrated teeth, according to Lowe.
It's an amazingly versatile concrete-like coloration that absolutely defies definition.
Looking at the abundant coloration from a fishy perspective, the new work demonstrates that people can be quite wrong about what's showy and what's subtle.
There is something obviously dated about The Origin of the Night--a quality apprehended almost subliminally through the coloration of its film stock and more overtly through its similarly distinctive combination of structuralist and phenomenological concerns: the reflexive emphasis on cinematic language, the equally self-conscious insistence on fostering a palpable experience of duration in the spectator.
By the same token, hellebores in the right soil will readily reseed themselves, young plants slowly developing to produce flowers whose coloration may differ greatly from that of the mother plant.
Ismael Galvan and his team of expert researchers conducted a study on about 9000 bird species' plumage coloration to answer the very question.
In addition, eggshell coloration, specifically blue-green coloration, may signal a female's quality to her mate.
Objective: Coloration is a multifunctional attribute of modern animals but its evolutionary history is poorly resolved, in part due to our limited ability to recognize and interpret fossil evidence of colour.
An ancient snakeskin preserves signs of the bright green coloration of its wearer, researchers report online March 31 in Current Biology.
Presence of atypical coloration in mammals can be due to an excess or deficiency of melanin pigment, with these anomalies caused by genetic mutations (Griffiths et al.