colorblind


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col·or·blind

or col·or-blind  (kŭl′ər-blīnd′)
adj.
1. Partially or totally unable to distinguish certain colors.
2.
a. Not subject to racial prejudices.
b. Not discriminating on the basis of race: a college with a colorblind admissions policy.

col′or·blind′ness n.
References in periodicals archive ?
When it comes to race, is being colorblind the best approach?
Beyond Colorblind explores how religious communities can create spaces where ethnic identity is not just respected, but celebrated.
Today, on International Colorblind Awareness Day, UNO announced the launch of its newest deck, UNO ColorADD, the world's first card game for the colorblind.
00000yujjtp9fnelrr83acalkah3d) app that will help colorblind people see the world better.
Yet, colorblind as an ideal is different from colorblind as a reality.
The Colorblind Screen: Television in Post-Racial America, New York, NY: New York University Press, 2014, 363 pp.
Neville, Spanierman, and Doan (2006) found that colorblind racial attitudes involve a failure to acknowledge that discrimination can constitute societal racism, and these color-blind attitudes are negatively associated with MCC (see "Color-Blind Racial Attitude" section for detailed review).
2-4) is dedicated to an explication of the conceptual and ideological system of colorblind racism.
Duecker found cats and dogs to be colorblind, although there is some evidence that some dogs have a faint sense of color.
Bakke, Deslippe (American studies, Franklin & Marshall College) describes a longer and more varied history of opposition in the 15 years before Bakke, arguing that the challenges to affirmative action came from three sources--"labor unionism, colorblind liberalism, and colorblind conservatism"--with the unionists and the liberals initially leading the opposition.
Using a reactionary form of the old colorblind ideal of a society free from racial oppression, they have declared that our society must no longer see race at all-especially not in continued patterns of mistreatment and definitely not as a basis for remedial efforts.
Colorblind Shakespeare: New Perspectives on Race and Performance