colorfield


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Related to colorfield: Colorfield painting

col′or•field`

or col′or-field`,



adj.
of, pertaining to, or characteristic of abstract painting in which large flat areas of color are spread to cover the entire canvas.
[1960–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such work has been well received in many prominent settings over the past few years--Ernest Edmonds's wonderfully colored interactive pieces (shown alongside Mark Rothko's canvases) in the 2007 "ColorField Remix" exhibition in Washington D.C., for example, and Richard Browns Mimetic Starfish, commissioned for the opening of London's Millennium Dome, which the Times of London described as "the best thing in the Dome."
At that time, the '60s, he started framing his paintings with the gold-faced wooden strip that Greenbergian Colorfield painters were using.
One interactive program, written by Ernest Edmonds, was chosen by the curators of a Washington, D.C., art gallery to be run alongside the works of Mark Rothko, Clyfford Still, and Kenneth Noland, in a 2007 exhibition celebrating the 50th anniversary of the "ColorField" painters.
The well-known artists whose works are on display include the Swiss painter Alberto Giacometti, the Japanese/American sculptor Isamu Nogochi, the colorfield artists Mark Rothko and Clyfford Still.
While it takes its lead from a fairly well-known idea that Woolf's Monday or Tuesday stories dialogue with Fry's post-impressionist conceptions of art, it resituates this approach in light of the writings of key imagist poets, as well as Kandinsky's art, letting us newly experience this very brief work as the verbal reflection of two types of expressionism, action painting and colorfield painting.
Never forgetting his fascination with the Japanese paper he admired as a child, Scott Sandell attended college at the University of Minnesota, but studied painting, thinking that prints and works on paper were rather "souvenir-like." He was completely taken with the romance of colorfield paintings and was inspired by a quote from Frank Stella: "I want my paintings to look as good as the paint does in the can." Sandell continues, "The idea of 12 feet of red was absolutely earthshaking for me, and artists like Ken Noland, Helen Frankenthaler, Stella and Morris Louis, laid the groundwork for the universe I wanted to work in."
Above or beside each square, Zucker has positioned another square of equal size, produced in the same way but of solid color--an abstract colorfield forming a sky and foil to its more pictorial counterpart.