stainer

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stain

 (stān)
v. stained, stain·ing, stains
v.tr.
1. To discolor, soil, or spot: The spilled juice stained the carpet.
2. To bring into disrepute; taint or tarnish: The scandal stained the mayor's reputation.
3. To change the color of (a piece of wood, for example) by applying a stain.
4. To treat (a specimen for the microscope) with a reagent or dye in order to identify cell or tissue structures or microorganisms.
v.intr.
To produce or receive discolorations: upholstery that stains easily.
n.
1. A discolored or soiled spot or smudge: a stain that was difficult to scrub out.
2. A diminishment of one's moral character or good reputation by being associated with something disgraceful.
3. A liquid substance applied especially to wood that penetrates the surface and imparts a rich color.
4. A reagent or dye used for staining microscopic specimens.

[Middle English steinen, partly from Old French desteindre, desteign-, to deprive of color (des-, dis- + teindre, to dye, from Latin tingere), and partly from Old Norse steina, to paint.]

stain′a·ble adj.
stain′er n.
Synonyms: stain, blot1, brand, stigma, taint
These nouns denote a mark of discredit or disgrace, as on one's good name: a stain on his honor; a blot on an otherwise clean police record; the brand of cowardice; the stigma of ignominious defeat; the taint of political corruption.

Stainer

(ˈsteɪnə)
n
(Biography) Sir John. 1840–1901, British composer and organist, noted for his sacred music, esp the oratorio The Crucifixion (1887)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stainer - a worker who stains (wood or fabric)
worker - a person who works at a specific occupation; "he is a good worker"
References in periodicals archive ?
has received a patent for a pigment dispersion consisting of a first pigment made of a coloring pigment having a primary average particle diameter of 200 nm or smaller, or made of carbon black having an average particle diameter of a structure of 100 nm or smaller, and a second pigment made of barium sulfate having a primary average particle diameter of 55 nm or smaller, a pigment dispersant and a medium.
Other scientists have demonstrated that the intensity of some floral hues can depend upon the shape of the cells containing the coloring pigment.