coltsfoot


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Related to coltsfoot: elecampane, mullein

colts·foot

 (kōlts′fo͝ot′)
n. pl. colts·foots
1. A low perennial Eurasian herb (Tussilago farfara) in the composite family, naturalized in parts of North America and having dandelionlike flower heads and large, hoof-shaped basal leaves.
2. The dried leaves or flower heads of this plant, long used in herbal medicine to treat coughs.

[From the shape of its leaves.]

coltsfoot

(ˈkəʊltsˌfʊt)
n, pl -foots
(Plants) a European plant, Tussilago farfara, with yellow daisy-like flowers and heart-shaped leaves: a common weed: family Asteraceae (composites)

colts•foot

(ˈkoʊltsˌfʊt)

n., pl. -foots.
a composite plant, Tussilago farfara, with large leaves resembling a colt's foot.
[1545–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coltsfoot - tufted evergreen perennial herb having spikes of tiny white flowers and glossy green round to heart-shaped leaves that become coppery to maroon or purplish in fall
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Galax - evergreen herbs of southeastern United States
2.coltsfoot - perennial herb with large rounded leaves resembling a colt's foot and yellow flowers appearing before the leaves docoltsfoot - perennial herb with large rounded leaves resembling a colt's foot and yellow flowers appearing before the leaves do; native to Europe but now nearly cosmopolitan; used medicinally especially formerly
genus Tussilago, Tussilago - genus of low creeping yellow-flowered perennial herbs of north temperate regions: coltsfoots; in some classifications includes species often placed in other genera especially Homogyne and Petasites
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Translations
podběl
følfod
fárfarapie de caballotusilagouña de caballo
leskenlehti
podbiał
hästhovtussilago

coltsfoot

[ˈkəʊltsfʊt] N (coltsfoots (pl)) → uña f de caballo, fárfara f

coltsfoot

n pl <-s> (Bot) → Huflattich m

coltsfoot

[ˈkəʊltsˌfʊt] n (Bot) → farfara

coltsfoot

n (bot) uña de caballo
References in classic literature ?
He had inherited from his mother some acquaintance with medicinal herbs and their preparation--a little store of wisdom which she had imparted to him as a solemn bequest--but of late years he had had doubts about the lawfulness of applying this knowledge, believing that herbs could have no efficacy without prayer, and that prayer might suffice without herbs; so that the inherited delight he had in wandering in the fields in search of foxglove and dandelion and coltsfoot, began to wear to him the character of a temptation.
In addition, I was delighted last week to spot my first coltsfoot of the year.
Today, the fields and woods around the elegant church in Kilbarchan are fragrantlyfloriated by springtime daffodil, crocus, cherry, celandine and coltsfoot blossoms.
Herbs used in the various formulas include goldenseal, turmeric, echinacea, coltsfoot leaf, myrrh, licorice root, yarrow flowers and St.
BIRD NOTES With Julian Hughes | Stonechat PICTURE: DAVE MIDDLEMAN AFTER the snow, spring rapidly reloaded this week, with Coltsfoot flowers emerging from the soil, fluffy buds on willow trees and the first singing Chiffchaffs at RSPB Conwy on Sunday.
Breuner listed other herbal products available online but deemed unsafe for children: aconite (also known as bushi), species from the genus Aristolochia, belladonna, blue cohosh, borage, broom, calamus, chaparral, coltsfoot, comfrey, germander, life root, lobelia, pennyroyal, poke root, sassafras, skullcap, tansy ragwort, and wormwood.
Delicate macarons are decorated like coltsfoot or blue anemone flowers, and the meringue peaks on a coffee ice cream cake resemble mountains.
Hazel catkins have been out since December, and now, scaly-stemmed yellow coltsfoot flowers are appearing.
These are, in fact, harmless elements such as barley, (16) bay leaves, (17) bran, (18) wax (19) coltsfoot, (20) a piece of a cloak, (21) and a lizard (22) in Theocritus; and frankincense, (23) a woollen band, (24) verbena, (25) bay leaves, (26) wax, (27) clay, (28) bran, (29) and multi-coloured threads (30) in Vergil.
Breuner listed herbal products available online but deemed unsafe for children: aconite (also known as bushi), species from the genus Aristolochia, belladonna, blue cohosh, borage, broom, calamus, chaparral, coltsfoot, comfrey germander, life root, lobelia, pennyroyal, poke root, sassafras, skullcap, tansy ragwort, and wormwood.
Santolina was one of the herbs, mixed with chamomile, coltsfoot and carob syrup to produce herbal tobacco.