com-


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com-

or col- or con- or cor-
pref.
Together; with; joint; jointly: commingle.

[Middle English, from Latin, from Old Latin com; see kom in Indo-European roots.]

com-

or

con-

prefix
together; with; jointly: commingle.
[from Latin com-; related to cum with. In compound words of Latin origin, com- becomes col- and cor- before l and r, co- before gn, h, and most vowels, and con- before consonants other than b, p, and m. Although its sense in compounds of Latin derivation is often obscured, it means: together, with, etc (combine, compile); similar (conform); extremely, completely (consecrate)]

COM

(kɒm)

n.
Comedy Central (a cable television channel).

com-

,
a prefix occurring in loanwords from Latin, where it and its variants meant “with,” “together with,” and denoted joint or simultaneous action ( colloquy; confer; convene), partnership ( colleague), union ( coitus; colleat; combine), or enclosure (content), or marked the completed nature of the action of a verb (conclude; confection); com- is used before b, p, m (combine; compare; commingle).
For variants before other sounds, see co-, col-1, con-, cor-.
[< Latin cum with]

Com.

1. Commander.
2. Commission.
3. Commissioner.
4. Committee.
5. Commodore.
6. Commonwealth.

com.

1. comedy.
2. comma.
3. command.
4. commander.
5. commerce.
6. commercial.
7. commission.
8. commissioner.
9. committee.
10. common.
11. commonly.
12. communications.
References in classic literature ?
In the eastern sky there was a yel- low patch like a rug laid for the feet of the com- ing sun; and against it, black and patternlike, loomed the gigantic figure of the colonel on a gigantic horse.
The master is fre- quently compelled to sell this class of his slaves, out of deference to the feelings of his white wife; and, cruel as the deed may strike any one to be, for a man to sell his own children to human flesh-mongers, it is often the dictate of humanity for him to do so; for, unless he does this, he must not only whip them himself, but must stand by and see one white son tie up his brother, of but few shades darker com- plexion than himself, and ply the gory lash to his naked back; and if he lisp one word of disapproval, it is set down to his parental partiality, and only makes a bad matter worse, both for himself and the slave whom he would protect and defend.
Then he showed Huckleberry how to make an H and an F, and the oath was com- plete.