comb jelly


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comb jelly

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

comb jelly

n
(Animals) another name for a ctenophore
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

comb′ jel`ly

(koʊm)
n.
any marine invertebrate of the phylum Ctenophora, having an oval, transparent body with eight rows of comblike ciliated bands used for swimming. Also called ctenophore.
[1885–90]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

comb jelly

(kōm)
Any of various invertebrate animals living in the ocean and having transparent, jelly-like bodies. Comb jellies have eight rows of comb-like cilia used for swimming.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.comb jelly - biradially symmetrical hermaphroditic solitary marine animals resembling jellyfishes having for locomotion eight rows of cilia arranged like teeth in a combcomb jelly - biradially symmetrical hermaphroditic solitary marine animals resembling jellyfishes having for locomotion eight rows of cilia arranged like teeth in a comb
invertebrate - any animal lacking a backbone or notochord; the term is not used as a scientific classification
Ctenophora, phylum Ctenophora - comb jellies; sea acorns; a small phylum formerly considered a class of Coelenterata
comb-plate, ctene - a locomotor organ consisting of a row of strong cilia whose bases are fused
beroe - delicately iridescent thimble-shaped ctenophores
platyctenean - ctenophore have long tentacles and flattened body
sea gooseberry - ctenophore having a rounded body with longitudinal rows of cilia
Cestum veneris, Venus's girdle - ctenophore having a ribbon-shaped iridescent gelatinous body
comb - ciliated comb-like swimming plate of a ctenophore
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fossil could help solve a modern-day mystery about the origins of a gelatinous carnivore called a comb jelly, a study published in the scientific journal Current Biology revealed last week.
According to the paper, particularly damaging examples of worldwide species which have been spread through these channels include: the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha and the Asian clam Potamocorbula amurensis in the US, the comb jelly Mnemiopsis leidyi in the Black and Azov Seas, and the toxic dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum and the northern Pacific sea star Asterias amurensis in Australia
Caption: A fossil of a newly described species of comb jelly, Gemmactena actinala, hints that some rigid spine kept a flap (right side of left image) from twisting and gave the complicated shape (right image) some support.
Now in an in-depth look at the genes of 10 comb jelly species, researchers report that these mysterious creatures evolved a unique nervous system in a completely different way than the rest of the animal kingdom.
The cornerstone of the study is the researchers' sequencing, assembly, annotation and analysis of the genome of Mnemiopsis leidyi, a comb jelly native to the coastal waters of the western Atlantic Ocean.
Harmful non-native species, such as the comb jelly in the Black Sea and the zebra mussel in the U.S.
One species of comb jelly, Mnemiopsis leidyi (pronounced NEE-mee-OP-sis), is a native of coastal waters from Massachusetts to Argentina.
CREEP SEA: From left, a physonect siphonophore jellyfish, yeti crab, vent annelid worm and, below, a cydippid comb jelly' FISH FEATURES: The amazing photos of the lantern fish, left, the syrtensis octopus, top, and the radiolarian amoeba, above
We studied swimming behavior of the comb jelly Mnemiopsis mccradyi (Phylum Ctenophora) subjected to the altered gravitational forces generated by NASA's KC-135 aircraft.
The jellyfish -- 2 centimeters in diameter and 1.5 cm long -- is a kind of comb jelly and has four gonads, half the usual number in jellyfish.