combined


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com·bine

 (kəm-bīn′)
v. com·bined, com·bin·ing, com·bines
v.tr.
1. To bring into a state of unity; make united: combined the ingredients in a bowl; combined the eggs and flour.
2. To join (two or more substances) to make a single substance, such as a chemical compound; mix.
3. To have, exhibit, or involve in combination: The choreography combines artistry and athletics.
4. (kŏm′bīn′) To harvest (a grain crop) using a cutting, threshing, and cleaning machine.
v.intr.
1. To become united: factors that combined to produce a storm.
2. To join together for a common purpose. See Synonyms at join.
3. Chemistry To form a compound.
4. (kŏm′bīn′) To harvest a grain crop using a cutting, threshing, and cleaning machine.
n. (kŏm′bīn′)
1. A power-operated harvesting machine that cuts, threshes, and cleans grain.
2. An association of people or groups united for the furtherance of political or commercial interests.
3. A combination.

[Middle English combinen, from Old French combiner, from Late Latin combīnāre : Latin com-, com- + bīnī, two by two; see dwo- in Indo-European roots.]

com·bin′er n.

combined

(kəmˈbaɪnd)
adj
1. united; comprising more than one part: a combined attack.
2. taken as a whole: a combined income of £50,000.

combined

Between two or more forces or agencies of two or more allies. (When all allies or services are not involved, the participating nations and services shall be identified, e.g., combined navies.) See also joint.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.combined - made or joined or united into one
uncombined - not joined or united into one
Translations
skupenzdružen

combined

[kəmˈbaɪnd] adj
(= joint) [effort] → conjugué(e); [attack] → combiné(e)
(= total) [size, quantity] → total(e)
combined assets → capital m communcombined honours n (British) (= degree course) to do combined honours → faire un double cursuscombine harvester [ˌkɒmbaɪnˈhɑːrvɪstər] nmoissonneuse-batteuse f

combined

adjgemeinsam; talents, effortsvereint; forcesvereinigt; combined within Kombination mit; (esp clothes, furniture) → kombiniert mit; a combined clock and wirelesseine Radiouhr; a combined radio and tape recorderRadio ntund Tonband ntin einem; combined downhill (Ski) → Kombinationsabfahrt f; combined event (Sport) → Mehrkampf m; (Ski) → Kombination f; combined honours (Brit Univ) → Doppelstudium nt; combined operations (Mil) → gemeinsame Operation; combined time (Sport) → Gesamtzeit f
References in classic literature ?
For as there are persons who, by conscious art or mere habit, imitate and represent various objects through the medium of colour and form, or again by the voice; so in the arts above mentioned, taken as a whole, the imitation is produced by rhythm, language, or 'harmony,' either singly or combined.
The clever combatant looks to the effect of combined energy, and does not require too much from individuals.
Men uniting in these combinations always assume such relations toward one another that the larger number take a more direct share, and the smaller number a less direct share, in the collective action for which they have combined.
The great hatch is scrubbed and placed upon the try-works, completely hiding the pots; every cask is out of sight; all tackles are coiled in unseen nooks; and when by the combined and simultaneous industry of almost the entire ship's company, the whole of this conscientious duty is at last concluded, then the crew themselves proceed to their own ablutions; shift themselves from top to toe; and finally issue to the immaculate deck, fresh and all aglow, as bridegrooms new-leaped from out the daintiest Holland.
Ferguson, by an ingenious arrangement, combined the advantages of two balloons, without incurring their inconveniences.
I have therefore herein combined 'Al Aaraaf' and 'Tamerlane' with other poems hitherto unprinted.
I had heard in a vague way of the place, as a whim of a certain young nobleman who combined brains with the pursuit of pleasure.
After having combined with the Executive in betraying the interests of the nation in a ruinous treaty, what prospect, it is asked, would there be of their being made to suffer the punishment they would deserve, when they were themselves to decide upon the accusation brought against them for the treachery of which they have been guilty?
They were such as all undertakings of the kind, involving combined operations by sea and land, are liable to.
The combined fleets of 1805, just come out of port, and attended by nothing but the disturbing memories of reverses, presented to our approach a determined front, on which Captain Blackwood, in a knightly spirit, congratulated his Admiral.
Effects of external conditions -- Use and disuse, combined with natural selection; organs of flight and of vision -- Acclimatisation -- Correlation of growth -- Compensation and economy of growth -- False correlations -- Multiple, rudimentary, and lowly organised structures variable -- Parts developed in an unusual manner are highly variable: specific characters more variable than generic: secondary sexual characters variable -- Species of the same genus vary in an analogous manner -- Reversions to long lost characters -- Summary.
The experience of ages, with the continued and combined labors of the most enlightened legislatures and jurists, has been equally unsuccessful in delineating the several objects and limits of different codes of laws and different tribunals of justice.

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