combustible


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Related to combustible: Combustible Liquid

com·bus·ti·ble

 (kəm-bŭs′tə-bəl)
adj.
1. Capable of igniting and burning.
2. Easily aroused or excited.
n.
A substance that ignites and burns readily.

com·bus′ti·bil′i·ty n.
com·bus′ti·bly adv.

combustible

(kəmˈbʌstəbəl)
adj
1. (Chemistry) capable of igniting and burning
2. easily annoyed; excitable
n
(Chemistry) a combustible substance
comˌbustiˈbility, comˈbustibleness n
comˈbustibly adv

com•bus•ti•ble

(kəmˈbʌs tə bəl)

adj.
1. capable of catching fire and burning; inflammable; flammable.
2. easily excited.
n.
3. a combustible substance.
[1520–30; < Late Latin]
com•bus`ti•bil′i•ty, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.combustible - a substance that can be burned to provide heat or powercombustible - a substance that can be burned to provide heat or power
fuel - a substance that can be consumed to produce energy; "more fuel is needed during the winter months"; "they developed alternative fuels for aircraft"
Adj.1.combustible - capable of igniting and burning
incombustible, noncombustible - not capable of igniting and burning

combustible

adjective flammable, explosive, incendiary, inflammable Methane is a highly combustible gas.
Translations
قابِل للأحْتِراق
hořlavý
brændbar
éghetõ
eldfimur
degimasdegus
viegli aizdedzināms
tutuşabiliryanabilir

combustible

[kəmˈbʌstɪbl]
A. ADJcombustible
B. Ncombustible m

combustible

[kəmˈbʌstɪbəl] adj [substance] → combustible

combustible

adjbrennbar

combustible

[kəmˈbʌstɪbl] adjcombustibile

combustible

(kəmˈbastəbl) adjective
liable to catch fire and burn. combustible materials.
combustion (kəmˈbastʃən) noun
burning. the combustion of gases.
References in classic literature ?
Then with expanded wings he stears his flight Aloft, incumbent on the dusky Air That felt unusual weight, till on dry Land He lights, if it were Land that ever burn'd With solid, as the Lake with liquid fire; And such appear'd in hue, as when the force Of subterranean wind transports a Hill Torn from PELORUS, or the shatter'd side Of thundring AETNA, whose combustible And fewel'd entrals thence conceiving Fire, Sublim'd with Mineral fury, aid the Winds, And leave a singed bottom all involv'd With stench and smoak: Such resting found the sole Of unblest feet.
Or if the combustible materials that now seem to be collecting should be dissipated without coming to maturity, or if a flame should be kindled without extending to us, what security can we have that our tranquillity will long remain undisturbed from some other cause or from some other quarter?
It had been used, apparently, in remote feudal times, for the worst purposes of a donjon-keep, and, in later days, as a place of deposit for powder, or some other highly combustible substance, as a portion of its floor, and the whole interior of a long archway through which we reached it, were carefully sheathed with copper.
When I burn this combustible for the manufacture of sodium, the smoke, escaping from the crater of the mountain, gives it the appearance of a still-active volcano.
Whatever is combustible flashes into flame at its touch, lead runs like water, it softens iron, cracks and melts glass, and when it falls upon water, incontinently that explodes into steam.
After holding a council, the captains ordered their troops to collect sticks, straws, dry weeds, and whatever combustible stuff they could find, and make a pile of it, heaping it high around the head of Hercules.
The doctor lit the combustible in his cylinder and turned the flame so as to produce a rapid heat, and the balloon, which had rested on the ground in perfect equipoise, began to rise in a few minutes, so that the seamen had to slacken the ropes they held it by.
Now cotton, combined with cold nitric acid, become transformed into a substance eminently insoluble, combustible, and explosive.
Remembering the quantity of combustible objects in the vestry--the straw, the papers, the packing-cases, the dry wood, the old worm-eaten presses--all the probabilities, in my estimation, point to the fire as the result of an accident with his matches or his light.
The furniture being very dry, and rendered more combustible by wax and oil, besides the arts they had used, took fire at once.
All this while they fired not a gun, because they would not waken the people faster than they could master them; but the fire began to waken them fast enough, and our fellows were glad to keep a little together in bodies; for the fire grew so raging, all the houses being made of light combustible stuff, that they could hardly bear the street between them.
I suppose you can enjoy a fire without stealing the combustibles.