comedy of manners

(redirected from comedies of manners)

comedy of manners

n. pl. comedies of manners
A comedy satirizing the attitudes and behavior of a particular social group, often of fashionable society.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

comedy of manners

n
1. (Theatre) a comedy dealing with the way of life and foibles of a social group
2. (Theatre) the genre represented by works of this type
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

com′edy of man′ners


n.
a comedy satirizing the manners and customs of a social class.
[1815–25]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Part 2, "Texts," includes: Steven Price, "Deconstructive Strategies in Wildes Social Comedies: From Melodrama to Deconstruction" (113-32), Richard Allen Cave, "Ernest in Name, but how Earnest in Manner?: Acting in Wildes Comedy" (133-50); Helena Gurfinkel, "'Would You Kindly Inform Me Who I Am?: Wildes Comedies of Manners as Tragedies," (151-68); Helen Davies, '"You Will Call Me Sister, Will You Not?': Friendship, Solidarity, and Conflict between Women in Wilde's Society Plays" (169-88); S.
Tidmarsh goes through the old forms in timely order: the types of tragedy: Greek, Roman, Elizabethan and Jacobean tragedy; and the types of comedy: Greek, Roman, romantic comedy from Shakespeare, comedies of manners, Chekhov, the chivalric romance and the pastoral.
Turning for the third time to the work of British playwright Alan Ayckbourn ("Private Fears in Public Places"), whose highly theatrical comedies of manners have made good matches for Resnais' consuming interest in form as a vessel for character and emotion, "Life" doesn't find the 91-year-old helmet doing anything he hasn't done before, but it does find him doing it in ebullient, beautifully stylized fashion, aided by an able-bodied ensemble drawn from his regular corps of traveling players.
The word "Harlequin," which shares a derivation with the "harlequinade" or the English "Punch and Judy" shows, is a fitting name for the low-brow, mass-market version of Jane Austen's comedies of manners. Although Swift would never suggest that A Showgirl for Santa is a direct literary heir of Pride and Prejudice, she believes that Harlequin offers its readers entertaining and comforting variations on that standard romance tale.
NOT to be confused with Saturday Night Fever, this is the third in Whit Stillman's comedies of manners.
The trilogy does comprise "three comedies of manners," she writes, which share an "impulse toward ironic humor."(6) Textual evidence confirms Glasgow's view, and C.
Asnyk also wrote comedies of manners, such as Galazka heliotropu (1869; "A Sprig of Heliotrope"), and historical tragedies.
She shone as a contributor to Punch; and from 1907 onwards she became a successful writer of popular novels and comedies of manners. Julie Speedie has drawn on a great deal of previously uncollected material, some of it in the form of personal letters like the forty or more written to Osbert Sitwell.
The most notable results of the experiments with new forms were heroic dramas and comedies of manners. Heroic plays were briefly fashionable, but their style was too extreme.
He wrote ambiguous comedies of manners, bluntly realistic on the one hand, while carrying mysterious symbolic overtones on the other.
Cibber also wrote other comedies of manners, including She wou'd, and She wou'd not (1702) and The Careless Husband (1704).
His three comedies of manners are Love in a Tub, She Would if She Could, and The Man of Mode.