comedy


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com·e·dy

 (kŏm′ĭ-dē)
n. pl. com·e·dies
1.
a. A dramatic work that is light and often humorous or satirical in tone and that usually contains a happy resolution of the thematic conflict.
b. The genre made up of such works.
2. A literary or cinematic work of a comic nature or that uses the themes or methods of comedy.
3. Popular entertainment composed of jokes, satire, or humorous performance.
4. The art of composing or performing comedy.
5. A humorous element of life or literature: the human comedy of political campaigns.
6. A humorous occurrence.
Idiom:
comedy of errors
A ludicrous event or sequence of events: The candidate's campaign turned out to be a political comedy of errors.

[Middle English comedie, from Medieval Latin cōmēdia, from Latin cōmoedia, from Greek kōmōidia, from kōmōidos, comic actor : kōmos, revel + aoidos, singer (from aeidein, to sing; see wed- in Indo-European roots).]

comedy

(ˈkɒmɪdɪ)
n, pl -dies
1. (Theatre) a dramatic or other work of light and amusing character
2. (Theatre) the genre of drama represented by works of this type
3. (Theatre) (in classical literature) a play in which the main characters and motive triumph over adversity
4. the humorous aspect of life or of events
5. an amusing event or sequence of events
6. humour or comic style: the comedy of Chaplin.
[C14: from Old French comédie, from Latin cōmoedia, from Greek kōmōidia, from kōmos village festival + aeidein to sing]

com•e•dy

(ˈkɒm ɪ di)

n., pl. -dies.
1. a play, movie, etc., of light and humorous character with a cheerful ending.
2. the branch of drama concerned with this form of composition.
3. the comic element of drama, of literature generally, or of life.
4. any comic or humorous incident or series of incidents.
[1350–1400; Middle English comedye < Medieval Latin cōmēdia, Latin cōmoedia < Greek kōmōidía <kōmōid(ós) comedian (kômo(s) merrymaking + aoidós singer)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.comedy - light and humorous drama with a happy endingcomedy - light and humorous drama with a happy ending
drama - the literary genre of works intended for the theater
black comedy - comedy that uses black humor
commedia dell'arte - Italian comedy of the 16th to 18th centuries improvised from standardized situations and stock characters
dark comedy - a comedy characterized by grim or satiric humor; a comedy having gloomy or disturbing elements
farce, farce comedy, travesty - a comedy characterized by broad satire and improbable situations
high comedy - a sophisticated comedy; often satirizing genteel society
low comedy - a comedy characterized by slapstick and burlesque
melodrama - an extravagant comedy in which action is more salient than characterization
seriocomedy, tragicomedy - a comedy with serious elements or overtones
sitcom, situation comedy - a humorous drama based on situations that might arise in day-to-day life
slapstick - a boisterous comedy with chases and collisions and practical jokes
tragedy - drama in which the protagonist is overcome by some superior force or circumstance; excites terror or pity
2.comedy - a comic incident or series of incidents
fun, sport, play - verbal wit or mockery (often at another's expense but not to be taken seriously); "he became a figure of fun"; "he said it in sport"

comedy

noun
1. light entertainment, sitcom (informal) Channel Four's comedy, 'Father Ted'
light entertainment opera, tragedy, soap opera, melodrama, high drama, serious play
2. humour, fun, joking, farce, jesting, slapstick, wisecracking, hilarity, witticisms, facetiousness, chaffing He and I provided the comedy with songs and monologues.
humour sadness, seriousness, melancholy, solemnity
Quotations
"Comedy is an imitation of the common errors of our life" [Sir Philip Sidney The Defence of Poetry]
"The world is a comedy to those that think, a tragedy to those that feel" [Horace Walpole Letters]
"All tragedies are finish'd by a death,"
"All comedies are ended by a marriage" [Lord Byron Don Juan]

comedy

noun
Translations
كوميدياكوميديا، مَلْهاهمَرَح، فُكاهَه
komediekomičnost
komediekomik
komedia
komedija
vígjáték
gamanleikurgamansemi, skoplegt atvik
コメディー
코미디
komedijakomikaskomiškumas
komēdijakomisms
komédia
komedija
komedi
ละครตลก
komedikomiklik
hài kịch

comedy

[ˈkɒmɪdɪ]
A. N (gen) → comedia f; (= humour of situation) → comicidad f
comedy of mannerscomedia f de costumbres
B. CPD comedy show N (TV) → programa m de humor

comedy

[ˈkɒmədi]
n
(= type of entertainment) → comédie f
(= play, film) → comédie f
modif [drama, series, romance, western] → comiquecomedy club n club où des comiques se produisentcomedy show ncomédie f

comedy

n
(Theat) → Komödie f, → Lustspiel nt; comedy programmeUnterhaltungsprogramm nt; comedy writerLustspielautor(in) m(f)or (classical) → -dichter(in) m(f); “Comedy of Errors”Komödie der Irrungen; the entire deal was just a comedy of errors (fig)bei dem Geschäft ging aber auch alles daneben; low comedyKlamauk m; high comedyechte or gekonnte Komödie; to act in comedyKomödiendarsteller(in) m(f)sein
(fig)Komödie f, → Theater nt (inf)

comedy

[ˈkɒmɪdɪ] n (gen) → commedia brillante; (humour) → lato comico

comedy

(ˈkomədi) plural ˈcomedies noun
1. a play of a pleasant or amusing kind. We went to see a comedy last night.
2. humour. They all saw the comedy of the situation.
comedian (kəˈmiːdiən) feminine comedienne (kəmiːdiˈen, (American) kəˈmi:diən) noun
a performer who tells jokes or acts in comedies.

comedy

كوميديا komedie komedie Komödie κωμωδία comedia, humorismo komedia comédie komedija commedia コメディー 코미디 komedie komedie komedia comédia комедия komedi ละครตลก komedi hài kịch 喜剧
References in classic literature ?
A comedy is a play which shows the merry side of life and has a happy ending.
A play named Ralph Roister Doister is generally looked upon as the first real English comedy.
Epic poetry and Tragedy, Comedy also and Dithyrambic: poetry, and the music of the flute and of the lyre in most of their forms, are all in their general conception modes of imitation.
The following personage appears in other stories of the Human Comedy.
To Homer were popularly ascribed certain burlesque poems in which Aristotle ("Poetics" iv) saw the germ of comedy.
I have a blue-eyed daughter who is my Beauty daughter, I have a Sentiment daughter, and I have a Comedy daughter.
This is my Comedy daughter, Kitty--sings a little but don't play.
Monseigneur had been out at a little supper last night, where the Comedy and the Grand Opera were charmingly represented.
He was driven on, and other carriages came whirling by in quick succession; the Minister, the State-Projector, the Farmer-General, the Doctor, the Lawyer, the Ecclesiastic, the Grand Opera, the Comedy, the whole Fancy Ball in a bright continuous flow, came whirling by.
I feel as if I could be anything or everything; as if I could rant and storm, or sigh or cut capers, in any tragedy or comedy in the English language.
After a short pause, however, the subject still continued, and was discussed with unabated eagerness, every one's inclination increasing by the discussion, and a knowledge of the inclination of the rest; and though nothing was settled but that Tom Bertram would prefer a comedy, and his sisters and Henry Crawford a tragedy, and that nothing in the world could be easier than to find a piece which would please them all, the resolution to act something or other seemed so decided as to make Edmund quite uncomfortable.
For side-splitting comedy we would refer our readers to the correspondence between the Board of Control and the Cretan premier during the "war.