comma splice


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comma splice

com′ma fault`


n.
the misuse of a comma, rather than a semicolon, colon, or period, to separate related main clauses not joined by a conjunction.
[1930–35]
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References in periodicals archive ?
comma splice = independent clause + comma + independent clause In Standard American English, a comma is not the appropriate punctuation mark for this situation; the clauses should be separated by a period or joined by a semicolon.
Kinnell's comma splice is less a comma splice than an elliptical "and." Kinnell is simply suppressing the "ands" and running sentences into each other.
So did a run-on sentence, a dangling introductory participial phrase, an instance of faulty parallel construction, one comma splice (but not two other comma splices), and a sentence in which "I" is used in the objective case in a compound with a noun.
YOUR GRAMMAR SCHOOL teacher probably called them comma splices. Or maybe you first knew them as run on sentences.
A related problem is the comma splice, in which two independent clauses are separated only by a comma.
This year we resolve to avoid the dreaded comma splice and spell everyone's name right.
You made it easy for me in your 'Writing Disorders' column in the Aug/Sept Communication World: a horrible comma splice festers near the top of the second column.
Lay is made to cite a physicist who says that women "will ever do great science," when in fact he said (he was misguided!) that women "will never do great science." Dombrowski himself seems to blame the Presidential commission that investigated the Challenger disaster for "the commission's unwillingness to avoid assigning personal responsibility" when the context suggests that he meant either "unwillingness to assign" or "willingness to avoid." Jo Allen's alleged comma splice that "most of the communication skills focus on speech, not writing those that do focus on writing tend to concentrate on literary writing" is challenged for pride of place by R.
A health department print ad warns that "Secondhand smoke kills 55,000 people annually in the U.S., that's three deaths every day...." And that string of words is a paradigmatic run-on sentence, or comma splice. It occurs when we place a comma between coordinate main clauses not connected by a conjunction.
Through the online dialogue box this takes considerably longer to accomplish; in one of my first sessions, a simple comma splice took over ten minutes to explain.
One consultant entitled the cartoon: "The Great Guillotine of Strunk and White"; then, she provided this caption: "So, this is the penalty for too many comma splices, eh?" (3) Another consultant used the contest to unload her own anxieties about writing: "As the professor handed the shredder a student's 75-page Bachelor's Essay, he said, 'I found a comma splice--you know what to do'." Another emphasized the gag quality of the single-panel cartoon: "I can't believe they spelled guillotine wrong again...." One consultant used the contest to underscore punctuation problems: "Slice this dangling participle!" while another ambitiously submitted two captions: "I'll never get ahead if this doesn't make the cut" and "This is too choppy," revealing her ability to pun.
Editing the journal isn't all comma splices and color swatches.