commander


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com·mand·er

 (kə-măn′dər)
n.
1. A person who commands, especially a commanding officer.
2.
a. A commissioned rank in the US Navy or Coast Guard that is above lieutenant commander and below captain.
b. One who holds this rank.
c. The chief commissioned officer of a military unit regardless of his or her rank.
3. An officer in some knightly or fraternal orders.

commander

(kəˈmɑːndə)
n
1. (Military) an officer in command of a military formation or operation
2. (Military) a naval commissioned rank junior to captain but senior to lieutenant commander
3. (Military) the second in command of larger British warships
4. someone who holds authority
5. a high-ranking member of some knightly or fraternal orders
6. (Law) an officer responsible for a district of the Metropolitan Police in London
7. (Historical Terms) history the administrator of a house, priory, or landed estate of a medieval religious order
comˈmanderˌship n

com•mand•er

(kəˈmæn dər, -ˈmɑn-)

n.
1. a person who commands.
2. a person who exercises authority; chief officer; leader.
3. the commissioned officer in command of a military unit.
4. an officer in the U.S. Navy or Coast Guard ranking below a captain and above a lieutenant commander.
5. the chief officer of a medieval order of knights.
6. a member of high rank in a modern fraternal order.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French]
com•mand′er•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commander - an officer in command of a military unitcommander - an officer in command of a military unit
SACLANT, Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic - commanding officer of ACLANT; a general of the United States Army nominated by the President of the United States and approved by the North Atlantic Council
SACEUR, Supreme Allied Commander Europe - commanding officer of ACE; NATO's senior military commander in Europe
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
commander in chief, generalissimo - the officer who holds the supreme command; "in the U.S. the president is the commander in chief"
military officer, officer - any person in the armed services who holds a position of authority or command; "an officer is responsible for the lives of his men"
wing commander - (RAF rank) one who is next below a group captain
2.commander - someone in an official position of authority who can command or control others
leader - a person who rules or guides or inspires others
3.commander - a commissioned naval officer who ranks above a lieutenant commander and below a captain
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
commissioned naval officer - a commissioned officer in the navy
4.commander - an officer in the airforcecommander - an officer in the airforce    
military man, serviceman, man, military personnel - someone who serves in the armed forces; a member of a military force; "two men stood sentry duty"

commander

noun leader, director, chief, officer, boss, head, captain, bass (S. African), ruler, commander-in-chief, commanding officer, C in C, C.O. The commander and some of his men had been released.
Translations
قائِد
korvetní kapitánvelitel
anførerhærførerorlogskaptajn
ülem
johtajakomentajapäällikkö
sjóliîsforingiyfirmaîur, stjórnandi
korvetný kapitán
poveljnik

commander

[kəˈmɑːndəʳ] N (Mil) → comandante mf (Hist) [of chivalric order] → comendador m (Naut) → capitán m de fragata

commander

[kəˈmɑːndər] n
[operation, organization] → chef m
[ship] → commandant mcommander-in-chief [kəˌmɑːndərɪnˈtʃiːf] ncommandant m en chef

commander

n
Führer(in) m(f); (Mil, Aviat) → Befehlshaber(in) m(f), → Kommandant(in) m(f); (Naut) → Fregattenkapitän(in) m(f); (Brit, Police) Distriktleiter der Londoner Polizei
(of order of chivalry)Komtur m

commander

[kəˈmɑːndəʳ] ncapo (Mil) → comandante m

command

(kəˈmaːnd) verb
1. to order. I command you to leave the room immediately!
2. to have authority over. He commanded a regiment of soldiers.
3. to have by right. He commands great respect.
noun
1. an order. We obeyed his commands.
2. control. He was in command of the operation.
commandant (komənˈdant) , ((American) ˈkoməndant) noun
an officer who has the command of a place or of a body of troops.
comˈmander noun
1. a person who commands. He was the commander of the expedition.
2. in the British navy, an officer of the rank next below the captain.
comˈmanding adjective
1. impressive. He has a commanding appearance.
2. with a wide view. The house had a commanding position on the hill.
comˈmandment noun
a command given by God, especially one of the ten given to Moses.
comˌmander-in-ˈchief noun
the officer in supreme command of an army, or of the entire forces of the state.
References in classic literature ?
On October 11, 1805, one of the infantry regiments that had just reached Braunau had halted half a mile from the town, waiting to be inspected by the commander in chief.
On the evening of the last day's march an order had been received that the commander in chief would inspect the regiment on the march.
The commander of the regiment was an elderly, choleric, stout, and thick-set general with grizzled eyebrows and whiskers, and wider from chest to back than across the shoulders.
The battalion commander perceived the jovial irony and laughed.
On my first voyage as chief mate with good Captain MacW- I remember that I felt quite flattered, and went blithely about my duties, myself a commander for all practical purposes.
That is the time, after your Departure is taken, when the spirit of your commander communes with you in a muffled voice, as if from the sanctum sanctorum of a temple; because, call her a temple or a "hell afloat" - as some ships have been called - the captain's state-room is surely the august place in every vessel.
Then is the spirit of the ship's commander stirred strongly again.
Some commanders of ships take their Departure from the home coast sadly, in a spirit of grief and discontent.
Arriving at Rotterdam, I succeeded in finding the commander of the Wednesday's steamer.
I hastened on board and asked for Commander Farragut.
At that moment Commander Farragut was ordering the last moorings to be cast loose which held the Abraham Lincoln to the pier of Brooklyn.
But Commander Farragut would not lose a day nor an hour in scouring the seas in which the animal had been sighted.

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