commensal


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com·men·sal

 (kə-mĕn′səl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characterized by a symbiotic relationship in which one species is benefited while the other is unaffected.
n.
An organism participating in a symbiotic relationship in which one species derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

[Middle English, sharing a meal, from Medieval Latin commēnsālis : Latin com-, com- + Latin mēnsa, table.]

com·men′sal·ly adv.

commensal

(kəˈmɛnsəl)
adj
1. (Biology) (of two different species of plant or animal) living in close association, such that one species benefits without harming the other
2. rare of or relating to eating together, esp at the same table: commensal pleasures.
n
3. (Biology) a commensal plant or animal
4. rare a companion at table
[C14: from Medieval Latin commensālis, from Latin com- together + mensa table]
comˈmensalism n
commensality n
comˈmensally adv

com•men•sal

(kəˈmɛn səl)

adj.
1. (of an animal, plant, fungus, etc.) living with, on, or in another, without injury to either.
n.
2. a commensal organism.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin commēnsālis. See com-, mensal2]
com•men′sal•ism, n.
com•men′sal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commensal - either of two different animal or plant species living in close association but not interdependent
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
Adj.1.commensal - living in a state of commensalism
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
Translations

com·men·sal

n. comensal, organismo que vive a expensas de otro sin beneficiarlo ni perjudicarlo.
References in periodicals archive ?
A paper published by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, IUCN, in 2004 begins: "A commensal relationship between otters and beavers has been documented, and use of beaver ponds for foraging and beaver lodges for denning is regarded as characteristic behaviour of otters."
M201 is comprised of a rationally designed consortium of commensal bacteria that were selected based on ability to modulate ulcerative colitis-relevant cellular mechanisms in human cell-based assays and animal models.
coli strains were isolated from fecal samples from community adults and can be considered as commensal strains (COLIVILLE collection) (26).
Joshua Lederberg, PhD, gave meaning to the term "microbiome" in 2001 as the "ecological community of commensal, symbiotic, and pathogenic microorganisms that literally share our body space." (1) This community of microorganisms comprises bacteria, fungi, viruses, archaea, and protists.
(4) The infant skin microbiome may, therefore, be at greater risk to support the growth of harmful or infectious microbes during this transition period, especially if something interferes with normal establishment of commensal bacteria.
In turn the commensal bacteria facilitate functional integrity of their encompassing terrain.
[4] This gave the normal commensal flora present in the oral cavity of participant as well as the bacterial load.
IBD is believed to result from interactions between genetic factors and environmental triggers, such as commensal bacteria with pathogenic potential.
This slowing down was irrespective of whether the microorganism was considered to be "pathogenic" (harmful) or "commensal" (normally found) in an infant's mouth.
There was a predominance of phylum Firmicutes over Actinobacteria; phylotypes Clostridales and Bacteroidales predominated over commensal Staphylococcus and Propionbacterium species.
Their topics include the tinted lens of Ancient Society: classical history and the American experience in the ethnology of Lewis Henry Morgan, the feast and commensal politics: ancient Greek prefiguration of anthropological concerns, arboreal animists: the (ab)use of Roman sacred trees in early anthropology, the Magna Graecia of Ernesto de Martino: studying ancient and contemporary evil eye, and comparativism then and now.