commensalism


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com·men·sal·ism

 (kə-mĕn′sə-lĭz′əm)
n.
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which one derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

com·men·sal·ism

(kə-mĕn′sə-lĭz′əm)
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which one derives benefit without harming the other. See Note at symbiosis.

commensalism

a relationship between animals or plants in which one lives with or on the other without damage to either. Cf. parasitism.
See also: Animals
the living together of two organisms in a relationship that is beneficial to one and has no effect on the other. — commensal, adj.
See also: Biology
the practice of eating together at the same table. Also commensality. — commensal, n., adj.
See also: Food and Nutrition
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commensalism - the relation between two different kinds of organisms when one receives benefits from the other without damaging it
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
References in periodicals archive ?
This is consistent with current belief that each of the subspecies originated within a relatively small geographic area in southwest Asia, followed by dramatic episodes of range expansion, much of it achieved through human commensalism (Geraldes et al.
Topics to discuss include mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism.
Much of Asia has a rich tradition of human-NHP commensalism, and macaques are common in villages, often as pets (10).
SOS simulates mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism, which are the symbiotic interaction mechanisms that organisms often adopt for survival in the ecosystem.
43) In her recent ethnography of a Cambodian village (Forest of struggle), Eve Zucker has also discussed the role of commensalism in creating powerful signs or displays of kin-like intimacy.
All fungi most often interact directly or indirectly through neutralism, commensalism, mutualism, competition, parasitism and synergism, in order to survive in their habitat [2].
Hence, host microbe interactions can range from mutualism through commensalism to parasitism in a continuous manner (2,3).
Humans have been distinguished from the animals first of all thanks to the system of rigid restriction of some instincts that was formed and fixed at a very early stage of human commensalism development, without which human evolution would take another path.
While potentially pathogenic GI tract microbes are kept in check by a homeostatic commensalism, their increased abundance has been associated with diseases that include anxiety, autoimmune-disease, diabetes, metabolic-syndrome, obesity, and stress-induced and progressive neuropsychiatric diseases including autism, schizophrenia and AD (22, 24).