commensalism


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com·men·sal·ism

 (kə-mĕn′sə-lĭz′əm)
n.
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which one derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

com·men·sal·ism

(kə-mĕn′sə-lĭz′əm)
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which one derives benefit without harming the other. See Note at symbiosis.

commensalism

a relationship between animals or plants in which one lives with or on the other without damage to either. Cf. parasitism.
See also: Animals
the living together of two organisms in a relationship that is beneficial to one and has no effect on the other. — commensal, adj.
See also: Biology
the practice of eating together at the same table. Also commensality. — commensal, n., adj.
See also: Food and Nutrition
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commensalism - the relation between two different kinds of organisms when one receives benefits from the other without damaging it
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
References in periodicals archive ?
The word is commensalism - an association of two species where one obtains benefits from the association without the other being harmed.
SOS has three nature-inspired optimization routines to iteratively obtain optimal solutions, which are the mutualism phase, the commensalism phase, and the parasitism phase.
of slavery and additions seeking to benefit women--as a commensalism
The lower intestine of human is the natural habitat of this bacterium, which resident in commensalism manner.
This involved transforming a metallurgical camp with regional architecture by giving it the complementary function of a tambo in which activities of political commensalism took place.
However, the thinnest barrier between commensalism and pathogenicity, which should lead researchers to rethink Koch's postulate (40), has rendered culturomics studies useful in the field of clinical microbiology despite a potential skepticism.
Organisms adjust their positions according to mutualism, commensalism, or parasitism interaction models in the ecosystem.
Consequently, seabirds need to develop strategies for coping with this highly oligotrophic environment, such as proficient flight, plunge diving (Ballance and Pitman, 1999), associations to fronts and high chlorophyll concentration areas (Thiers et al., 2014), "near-obligate commensalism" (Au and Pitman, 1989) or association with sub surface predators (Ballance et al., 1997, Jaquemet et al., 2004) and dual foraging (long and short foraging trips) strategies (Congdon et al., 2005; Shoji et al., 2015)
2013), thus suggesting that this interaction can be regarded as predation or parasitoidism rather than commensalism or parasitism (Gasca et al.