commensal

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Related to commensals: plankton, symbiosis

com·men·sal

 (kə-mĕn′səl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characterized by a symbiotic relationship in which one species is benefited while the other is unaffected.
n.
An organism participating in a symbiotic relationship in which one species derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

[Middle English, sharing a meal, from Medieval Latin commēnsālis : Latin com-, com- + Latin mēnsa, table.]

com·men′sal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

commensal

(kəˈmɛnsəl)
adj
1. (Biology) (of two different species of plant or animal) living in close association, such that one species benefits without harming the other
2. rare of or relating to eating together, esp at the same table: commensal pleasures.
n
3. (Biology) a commensal plant or animal
4. rare a companion at table
[C14: from Medieval Latin commensālis, from Latin com- together + mensa table]
comˈmensalism n
commensality n
comˈmensally adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

com•men•sal

(kəˈmɛn səl)

adj.
1. (of an animal, plant, fungus, etc.) living with, on, or in another, without injury to either.
n.
2. a commensal organism.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin commēnsālis. See com-, mensal2]
com•men′sal•ism, n.
com•men′sal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commensal - either of two different animal or plant species living in close association but not interdependent
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
Adj.1.commensal - living in a state of commensalism
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

com·men·sal

n. comensal, organismo que vive a expensas de otro sin beneficiarlo ni perjudicarlo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The microbiota that contribute to the class of resident microorganisms in a specific body habitat can be described broadly as commensals or mutualistic.
They prevent direct binding of any bacteria, even commensals, to endothelial cells.
Otherwise, quantitative cultures of BAL specimens are used; these specimens are less affected by upper airway commensals, but BAL is largely restricted to nosocomial or ventilator-associated pneumonia (10).
The researchers found that the total bacterial density was independent of the conditions of teeth surrounding the tongue, whereas the microbiota composition, especially the relative abundances of predominant commensals, showed an association with tooth conditions.
Intriguingly, the limited expansion of commensals Lactobacilli with known AhR agonist activity, such as L.
MyD88 and IL-1R1 knockout mice have reduced IL-17A production from TCR[sz]+ cells in the skin.[21],[22] Together, these data suggest that skin commensals are important in the inflammatory T-cell response.
Most of our migraine patients were women, the difference in commensals of the nose may be due to the sex difference.
They cover taxonomy and identification; population genetics of crayfish: endangered and invasive species; crayfish growth and reproduction; the behavior of crayfish; the chemical ecology of crayfish; parasites, commensals, pathogens, and diseases of crayfish; environmental drivers for population success: population biology, population and community dynamics; field sampling techniques; laboratory methods; and managing invasive crayfish.
Recent discoveries indicate that commensals play a central role in regulating human immune responses.
She says a few laboratories are making progress culturing consortia of human gut commensals in specialized environments called chemostats.
In the large bowel, the mucus layer is an organised structure, with an inner layer that blocks bacteria, and an outer layer where beneficial bacteria (commensals) can flourish.