commensal

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Related to commensals: plankton, symbiosis

com·men·sal

 (kə-mĕn′səl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characterized by a symbiotic relationship in which one species is benefited while the other is unaffected.
n.
An organism participating in a symbiotic relationship in which one species derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

[Middle English, sharing a meal, from Medieval Latin commēnsālis : Latin com-, com- + Latin mēnsa, table.]

com·men′sal·ly adv.

commensal

(kəˈmɛnsəl)
adj
1. (Biology) (of two different species of plant or animal) living in close association, such that one species benefits without harming the other
2. rare of or relating to eating together, esp at the same table: commensal pleasures.
n
3. (Biology) a commensal plant or animal
4. rare a companion at table
[C14: from Medieval Latin commensālis, from Latin com- together + mensa table]
comˈmensalism n
commensality n
comˈmensally adv

com•men•sal

(kəˈmɛn səl)

adj.
1. (of an animal, plant, fungus, etc.) living with, on, or in another, without injury to either.
n.
2. a commensal organism.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin commēnsālis. See com-, mensal2]
com•men′sal•ism, n.
com•men′sal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commensal - either of two different animal or plant species living in close association but not interdependent
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
Adj.1.commensal - living in a state of commensalism
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
Translations

com·men·sal

n. comensal, organismo que vive a expensas de otro sin beneficiarlo ni perjudicarlo.
References in periodicals archive ?
21],[22] Together, these data suggest that skin commensals are important in the inflammatory T-cell response.
In our study, commensals such as diphtheroids, micrococci, and bacteroides were noted in less number of migraine patients.
The meals are intended for pupils (about 350 half-boarders) as well as persons admitted to the catering service (about 10 commensals per day) for lunch on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, excluding school holidays; Ie 140 days estimated for the duration of a school year.
This acidic environment not only helps in their own growth, but also provide nexus for other commensals.
They cover taxonomy and identification; population genetics of crayfish: endangered and invasive species; crayfish growth and reproduction; the behavior of crayfish; the chemical ecology of crayfish; parasites, commensals, pathogens, and diseases of crayfish; environmental drivers for population success: population biology, population and community dynamics; field sampling techniques; laboratory methods; and managing invasive crayfish.
Given the right conditions, however, many protective commensals can cause infection.
Because the parasites, commensals, and symbionts inhabiting a particular species provide important information on the habits of the host, such as diet and habitat use (Bolek and Coggins, 2000, 2001; Yoder and Coggins, 2007), the principal aim of this work is examining individuals of D.
Recent discoveries indicate that commensals play a central role in regulating human immune responses.
A number of studies have also shown, both in vivo in gnotobiotic mice and in vitro, that candidal colonization of epithelia could be suppressed by streptococci, which are the predominant resident commensals of oral mucosal surfaces [33-35].
75% of the isolates were recovered as commensals in the pharynx and throat and from sputum (10).
She says a few laboratories are making progress culturing consortia of human gut commensals in specialized environments called chemostats.
Using mouse models, the NIH team observed that commensals contribute to protective immunity by interacting with the immune cells in the skin.