commissary

(redirected from commisary)
Also found in: Legal, Encyclopedia.

com·mis·sar·y

 (kŏm′ĭ-sĕr′ē)
n. pl. com·mis·sar·ies
1.
a. A supermarket for military personnel and their dependents, usually located on a military installation.
b. A store where food and equipment are sold, as in a mining camp.
2. A lunchroom or cafeteria, especially one in a film or television studio.
3. A person to whom a special duty is given by a higher authority; a deputy.

[Middle English commissarie, agent, from Medieval Latin commissārius, from Latin commissus, entrusted; see commission.]

commissary

(ˈkɒmɪsərɪ)
n, pl -saries
1. (Commerce) US a shop supplying food or equipment, as in a military camp
2. (Military) army US an officer responsible for supplies and food
3. (Film) US a snack bar or restaurant in a film studio
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a representative or deputy, esp an official representative of a bishop
[C14: from Medieval Latin commissārius official in charge, from Latin committere to entrust, commit]
commissarial adj
ˈcommissaryˌship n

com•mis•sar•y

(ˈkɒm əˌsɛr i)

n., pl. -sar•ies.
1. a store that sells food and supplies in a military post, mining camp or lumber camp.
2. a dining room or cafeteria, esp. in a motion-picture studio.
3. a person to whom some responsibility or role is delegated by a superior power; deputy.
4. (in France) a police official.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Medieval Latin commissārius < Latin commiss(us),committere to entrust]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commissary - a retail store that sells equipment and provisions (usually to military personnel)
post exchange, PX - a commissary on a United States Army post
shop, store - a mercantile establishment for the retail sale of goods or services; "he bought it at a shop on Cape Cod"
slop chest - commissary maintained aboard merchant ships to sell merchandise to the crew
small stores - personal items conforming to regulations that are sold aboard ship or at a naval base and charged to the person's pay
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
2.commissary - a snack bar in a film studio
snack bar, snack counter, buffet - usually inexpensive bar
Translations

commissary

[ˈkɒmɪsərɪ] N
1.comisario/a m/f político/a
2. (US) (= shop) → economato m

commissary

[ˈkɒmɪsəri] n (US) (MILITARY) (= shop) → intendance f

commissary

n
(Mil) → Intendant m
(= delegate)Beauftragte(r) mf
(US, Comm) → Laden min Lagern/auf Baustellen etc
References in classic literature ?
"And bring her back to us!" cried the commisary gaily...."Ah, that's a trick worth two of the Angel of Music's!"
All serene on the Rappahannock, troops in fine condition, commisary department well conducted, the Home Guard under Colonel Teddy always on duty, Commander in Chief General Laurence reviews the army daily, Quartermaster Mullet keeps order in camp, and Major Lion does picket duty at night.
Before the first stringhouse had been set on Bent Knob Ridge, the dining hall or train track or commisary built, an acre between Cove Creek and Noland Mountain had been set off for a graveyard.
The implications for a retail foodservice operation with a central commisary kitchen are enormous--it could even allow for the central kitchen to be many states away from the stores where the food would ultimately be served.
There was little supervision of Blair, even as he was bouncing off the walls, borrowing a company car for days at a time and charging huge bar' tabs at Robert Emmet's, a Time Square pub that served as the unofficial commisary for lower-echelon Times reporters.
A brief interview between Kitano and the great Taiwanese director, Hou Hsiaohsien takes place in a commisary and interestingly enough turns on questions directed to Kitano by the unassuming Hou, rather than the other way around.
Andrew McGee went to solitary for "pilfering Fish, which was entrusted to his care to clean," as did Robert Curtis for "stealing sundry articles from the commisary's [sic] Store." James Williams was punished with a clog and chain "for stealing milk from the men's allowance."(10)