commodify

(redirected from commodifiable)

com·mod·i·fy

 (kə-mŏd′ə-fī′)
tr.v. com·mod·i·fied, com·mod·i·fy·ing, com·mod·i·fies
To turn into or treat as a commodity; make commercial: "Such music ... commodifies the worst sorts of ... stereotypes" (Michiko Kakutani).


com·mod′i·fi′a·ble adj.
com·mod′i·fi·ca′tion (-fĭ-kā′shən) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

commodify

(kəˈmɒdɪˌfaɪ)
vb, -fies, -fying or -fied
(tr) to treat (something) inappropriately as if it can be acquired or marketed like other commodities: you can't commodify art.
comˌmodifiˈcation n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
kommodifizieren
상품화하다

commodify

[kəˈmɒdɪfaɪ] vttransformer en objet
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
This collection is not the first to discuss funding cuts, the emergence of more authoritarian managerial styles, the growth of non-academic bureaucracies, the increasing stress on commodifiable knowledge, job training, threats to disciplines that cannot increase enrolment, attacks on tenure, or the growth of precarious academic labour.
At the same time, ancestry is seductive and commodifiable and one's 'need to know' might bear a heavy price tag that is, at this stage, unknowable.
So if you have a medium that doesn't leave a surplus then it is not commodifiable. In other words, at the heart of what contemporary artists are doing, when they produce works with a short duration, is that they are also commenting on the role of art as something commodifiable, which then relates to the earlier argument of patronage.
Maybe this is where we should situate our highest hope, and maybe this highest hope is more necessary than ever before in twenty-first century educational and academic settings, on account of the seemingly unstoppable instrumentalization of knowledge, and the associated neo-liberal domestication of desire as a commodifiable economic good.
It would point to the social and class implications of the spread of literacy under Protestant sponsorship, the challenge to clerical authority in religion, and the very beginnings of a sense of religion as a material and commodifiable market.
I have also described neoliberalism as an imperial and colonizing set of constituent discourses (marketization, privatization, deregulation, commodification) that is constantly deployed with the aim of reframing and re-making more areas of life in its own image: that of the market and of private, commodifiable goods (Davidson-Harden, 2009b).
For the cartridge exists outside of a market economy and thus is driven by no commodifiable forces such as those condemned by Jameson and Hyde.
These markets and systems make the translation of "Chinese culture" necessary, while also rendering that culture eminently alienable and commodifiable, capable of being consumed across culturally specific boundaries.
Moreover, what is mocked here is precisely the desire for Buddhism to be something for us--for Tantra to fulfill capitalism's dream of commodifiable spirituality.
Perhaps it is easy to be wary of this film, to cynicize it in a way because what else have those who reveal themselves and their shortcomings onscreen become but another commodity?--as though their cravenness for fame, to become commodifiable, so easily translates into some sort of documented tell-all because to speak of horrors is still to speak of something.
On the one hand, they granted a new visibility to the ephemeral text as a potential object of value because the most prestigious sacral books had become displaced, fugitive, subject to appropriation and in some cases purgative recontextualization--all books were in a sense now "ephemeral"--and on the other, they reinforced ephemerality as a way of defining the limits of value in the market economy of print, particularly the boundary of the "unidentifiable mass of material" that is not commodifiable. Thus the bibliomaniac and the ephemerophile were not necessarily antithetical but were important to each other and in the case of Haslewood and numerous other book collectors of the period these identities were embodied in a single individual.
In contrast to research funded by corporate interests, this relationship between the laboratory and defense strategy has helped to improve our understanding of lobsters and other animals as more than commodifiable products through experiments like the one described.