commodify

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Related to commodified: Commoditise

com·mod·i·fy

 (kə-mŏd′ə-fī′)
tr.v. com·mod·i·fied, com·mod·i·fy·ing, com·mod·i·fies
To turn into or treat as a commodity; make commercial: "Such music ... commodifies the worst sorts of ... stereotypes" (Michiko Kakutani).


com·mod′i·fi′a·ble adj.
com·mod′i·fi·ca′tion (-fĭ-kā′shən) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

commodify

(kəˈmɒdɪˌfaɪ)
vb, -fies, -fying or -fied
(tr) to treat (something) inappropriately as if it can be acquired or marketed like other commodities: you can't commodify art.
comˌmodifiˈcation n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
kommodifizieren
상품화하다

commodify

[kəˈmɒdɪfaɪ] vttransformer en objet
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
By focusing on the commodified body, these films articulate anxieties that bodily practices like organ transplantation and cloning may evoke for contemporary audiences, while addressing broader questions such as ethics, ideology, power and/or technologies.
However, he clarified that the education and health sectors should not be commodified. Moreover, he spoke that there should be institutions to look after the people if the government fails to provide services to them.
Among her topics are an artefact of commodified culture: trading Wilde in the literary marketplace, forging the construct: Wilde the playwright in early 20th-century Vienna, and remodeling the construct: Wildean drama and the politics of disambiguation at the turn of the 21st century.
We looked at capacity and capitalism, wherein people are commodified, and the resultant chaos.
Challenging narrow categories of sex work, Noelle Stout details the many ways in which affect is commodified in Cuba's post-Soviet period.
Insecure cultural workers such as freelancers and adjuncts are the current features of the labor tendency at a moment where the mechanism of valorizing cultural goods is something individuals are likely to do free of charge, as before culture was entirely commodified in the postmodern epoch.
The conclusion Fuchs arrives at, and reiterates throughout each chapter, is that the Internet is heavily commodified, dominated by corporate interests and functions by exploiting its users.
This presentation is a multidisciplinary collection of essays that examines both historically and contemporary manifestations of appropriated and commodified forms of African American popular culture.
In the interests of profit, the Raptors market a commodified blackness while, as a franchise, remaining silent on the policing, state-sanctioned violence, and other forms of institutionalized racism to which Black bodies are subject to in the city on a daily basis.
Princess Anne is naive to think that horses would benefit from being commodified and processed through the meat trade.
A world, moreover, in which education has already been heavily commodified by the introduction of PS9,000-a-year university tuition fees.
And yet, their grammars and sounds, whether intimate, commodified or instrumentalised, push at the limits of theory and representation and simultaneously construct systems of aesthetic, ideological, historical and political appropriation.' This is the introduction to the second meeting of the 'Hearing Landscape Critically' network, to be held at Stellenbosch University, 9-11 September 2013.