commodity

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Related to commodities: commodities market

com·mod·i·ty

 (kə-mŏd′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. com·mod·i·ties
1. Something useful that can be turned to commercial or other advantage: "Left-handed, power-hitting third basemen are a rare commodity in the big leagues" (Steve Guiremand).
2. A product or service that is indistinguishable from ones manufactured or provided by competing companies and that therefore sells primarily on the basis of price rather than quality or style.
3. Archaic Advantage; benefit.

[Middle English commodite, from Old French convenience, from Latin commoditās, from commodus, convenient; see commodious.]

commodity

(kəˈmɒdɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. (Economics) an article of commerce
2. something of use, advantage, or profit
3. (Economics) economics an exchangeable unit of economic wealth, esp a primary product or raw material
4. (Economics) a quantity of goods
5. convenience or expediency
[C14: from Old French commodité, from Latin commoditās suitability, benefit; see commodious]

com•mod•i•ty

(kəˈmɒd ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. an article of trade or commerce, esp. a product as distinguished from a service.
2. something of use, advantage, or value.
3. any unprocessed or partially processed good, as a grain, fruit or vegetable, or a precious metal.
4. Obs. a quantity of goods.
[1375–1425; late Middle English commodite < Anglo-French < Latin commoditās timeliness, convenience <commod(us) (see commode)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commodity - articles of commercecommodity - articles of commerce      
artefact, artifact - a man-made object taken as a whole
staple, basic - (usually plural) a necessary commodity for which demand is constant
consumer goods - goods (as food or clothing) intended for direct use or consumption
drygoods, soft goods - textiles or clothing and related merchandise
entrant - a commodity that enters competition with established merchandise; "a well publicized entrant is the pocket computer"
export, exportation - commodities (goods or services) sold to a foreign country
fancy goods - goods that are chiefly ornamental
fungible - a commodity that is freely interchangeable with another in satisfying an obligation
future - bulk commodities bought or sold at an agreed price for delivery at a specified future date
import, importation - commodities (goods or services) bought from a foreign country
merchandise, product, ware - commodities offered for sale; "good business depends on having good merchandise"; "that store offers a variety of products"
middling - any commodity of intermediate quality or size (especially when coarse particles of ground wheat are mixed with bran)
shopping - the commodities purchased from stores; "she loaded her shopping into the car"women carrying home shopping didn't give me a second glance"
sporting goods - sports equipment sold as a commodity
worldly good, worldly possession - a commodity or good associated with the earthly, rather than the spiritual, existence of human beings
salvage - property or goods saved from damage or destruction

commodity

noun (usually plural) goods, produce, stock, products, merchandise, wares The government increased prices on several basic commodities.

commodity

noun
A product or products bought and sold in commerce:
good (used in plural), line, merchandise, ware.
Translations
سِلْعَه، بِضاعَه
druh zbožívýrobek
vare
avuhyödykemassahyödykeraaka-aine
vara
reikmuo
patēriņa priekšmetsprece
druh tovaru
malticarî eşya

commodity

[kəˈmɒdɪtɪ]
A. Nartículo m (de consumo or de comercio), producto m, mercancía f, mercadería f (LAm) (Fin, St Ex) → materia f prima
B. CPD commodity exchange Nbolsa f de artículos de consumo
commodity markets NPLmercados mpl de materias primas
commodity trade Ncomercio m de materias primas

commodity

[kəˈmɒdɪti] n
(= product) → marchandise f (= consumer good) → produit m, article m (= food) → denrée f

commodity

nWare f; (agricultural) → Erzeugnis nt; basic or staple commodities (natural) → Grundstoffe pl; (St Ex) → Rohstoffe pl; (manufactured) → Bedarfsgüter pl; (= foodstuffs)Grundnahrungsmittel pl; electricity is a commodity which every country needsStrom ist ein (Versorgungs)gut, das jedes Land braucht

commodity

[kəˈmɒdɪtɪ] nprodotto, articolo; (food) → derrata
basic commodities → beni mpl di prima necessità

commodity

(kəˈmodəti) plural comˈmodities noun
an article which is bought or sold. soap, toothpaste and other household commodities.
References in classic literature ?
It indeed is, as we have said, generally gainful for a person to contrive to make a monopoly of anything; for which reason some cities also take this method when they want money, and monopolise their commodities.
These coins being scarce, the people were often forced to barter their commodities instead of selling them.
Fruits are acceptable gifts, because they are the flower of commodities, and admit of fantastic values being attached to them.
The East-Indian and Chinese markets, the colonisation of America, trade with the colonies, the increase in the means of exchange and in commodities generally, gave to commerce, to navigation, to industry, an impulse
The cheap prices of its commodities are the heavy artillery with which it batters down all Chinese walls, with which it forces the barbarians' intensely obstinate hatred of foreigners to capitulate.
They may prefer a system which would give unlimited scope to all nations to be the carriers as well as the purchasers of their commodities.
In the trade to China and India, we interfere with more than one nation, inasmuch as it enables us to partake in advantages which they had in a manner monopolized, and as we thereby supply ourselves with commodities which we used to purchase from them.
Only two things indicated the social condition of Moscow- the rabble, that is the poor people, and the price of commodities.
A small stock of brown sugar, some white beans and split peas, and a few other commodities of low price, and such as are constantly in demand, made up the bulkier portion of the merchandise.
Nothing remained, except to take down the bar from the shop-door, leaving the entrance free--more than free--welcome, as if all were household friends--to every passer-by, whose eyes might be attracted by the commodities at the window.
The ladies who had commodities of their own to sell, and did not want dressing-gowns, saw at once the frivolity and bad taste of this masculine preference for goods which any tailor could furnish; and it is possible that the emphatic notice of various kinds which was drawn toward Miss Tulliver on this public occasion, threw a very strong and unmistakable light on her subsequent conduct in many minds then present.
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