common divisor


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common divisor

n.
A quantity that is a factor of two or more quantities. Also called common factor.

common divisor

n
(Mathematics) another name for common factor

com′mon divi′sor


n.
a number that is a submultiple of all the numbers of a given set. Also called com′mon fac′tor.
[1840–50]

common divisor

A number that is a factor of two or more numbers. For example, 3 is a common divisor of both 9 and 15. Also called common factor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.common divisor - an integer that divides two (or more) other integers evenly
divisor, factor - one of two or more integers that can be exactly divided into another integer; "what are the 4 factors of 6?"
greatest common divisor, greatest common factor, highest common factor - the largest integer that divides without remainder into a set of integers
References in periodicals archive ?
So if g is the greatest common divisor of the [[alpha].
What is striking about the sequence {30, 42, 54, 66, 78, 90, 144} is that the Greatest Common Divisor (CGD) for its 7 members is 6, which is a 'perfect number' because it equals the sum of its proper divisors (1+2+3=6).
Algorithm," she reads, "a set of rules for solving a problem in a finite number of steps, as for finding the greatest common divisor.
where C(s) is a left greatest common divisor of matrixes, and [?
To prove Corollary 2, note that the greatest common divisor of 4 and 6 is (4, 6) = 2, so from Corollary 1 we have the identity
He describes rings and fields, including linear equations in a field and vector spaces, polynomials over a field, factorization into primes, ideals and the greatest common divisor, solution of the general equation of nth degree, residual classes, extension fields, and isomorphisms.
Finding the Greatest Common Divisor and the Least Common Multiple is of Type [I.
In section II (24 pages) Gauss proves the uniqueness of the factorisation of integers into primes and defines the concepts of greatest common divisor and least common multiple.
If we exclude all points of the Minkowski lattice with coordinates have a common divisor different from unity, this plane will contain only "rational points" p/q (the non-cancelled fractions).
2], S(c) = xy/[absolute value of z], where GCD(S(a), S(b)) denotes the greatest common divisor of S(a) and S(b.