common law


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Related to common law: civil law, Common law marriage

common law

n.
1. Law established by court decisions rather than by statutes enacted by legislatures.
2. The law of England adopted by its territories and colonies, including the United States at the time of its formation.

common law

n
1. (Law) the body of law based on judicial decisions and custom, as distinct from statute law
2. (Law) the law of a state that is of general application, as distinct from regional customs
3. (Law) (modifier) : common-law denoting a marriage deemed to exist after a couple have cohabited for several years: common-law marriage; common-law wife.

com′mon law′


n.
the system of law originating in England, based on custom or court decisions rather than civil or ecclesiastical law.
[1300–50]

common law

The body of law based on court decisions, customs and practices rather than on statutes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.common law - (civil law) a law established by following earlier judicial decisionscommon law - (civil law) a law established by following earlier judicial decisions
service - (law) the acts performed by an English feudal tenant for the benefit of his lord which formed the consideration for the property granted to him
civil law - the body of laws established by a state or nation for its own regulation
2.common law - a system of jurisprudence based on judicial precedents rather than statutory laws; "common law originated in the unwritten laws of England and was later applied in the United States"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Translations
القانون العام
zvykové právo
sædvaneret
szokásjog
zvykové právo
örf ve âdete dayanan hukuk

common law

ndiritto consuetudinario

common

(ˈkomən) adjective
1. seen or happening often; quite normal or usual. a common occurrence; These birds are not so common nowadays.
2. belonging equally to, or shared by, more than one. This knowledge is common to all of us; We share a common language.
3. publicly owned. common property.
4. coarse or impolite. She uses some very common expressions.
5. of ordinary, not high, social rank. the common people.
6. of a noun, not beginning with a capital letter (except at the beginning of a sentence). The house is empty.
noun
(a piece of) public land for everyone to use, with few or no buildings. the village common.
ˈcommoner noun
a person who is not of high rank. The royal princess married a commoner.
common knowledge
something known to everyone or to most people. Surely you know that already – it's common knowledge.
common ˈlaw noun
a system of unwritten laws based on old customs and on judges' earlier decisions.
ˈcommon-law adjective
referring to a relationship between two people who are not officially married, but have the same rights as husband and wife. a common-law marriage; a common-law wife/husband.
ˈcommonplace adjective
very ordinary and uninteresting. commonplace remarks.
ˈcommon-room noun
in a college, school etc a sitting-room for the use of a group.
common sense
practical good sense. If he has any common sense he'll change jobs.
the Common Market
(formerly) an association of certain European countries to establish free trade (without duty, tariffs etc) among them, now replaced by the European Union.
the (House of) Commons
the lower house of the British parliament.
in common
(of interests, attitudes, characteristics etc) shared or alike. They have nothing in common – I don't know why they're getting married.
References in classic literature ?
In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise re-examined in any court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.
The precise extent of the common law, and the statute law, the maritime law, the ecclesiastical law, the law of corporations, and other local laws and customs, remains still to be clearly and finally established in Great Britain, where accuracy in such subjects has been more industriously pursued than in any other part of the world.
A judge at common law may be an ordinary man; a good judge of a carpet must be a genius.
Why, you'd have to go to Doctors' Commons with a suit, and you'd have to go to a court of Common Law with a suit, and you'd have to go to the House of Lords with a suit, and you'd have to get an Act of Parliament to enable you to marry again, and it would cost you
The other was his clerk, assistant, housekeeper, secretary, confidential plotter, adviser, intriguer, and bill of cost increaser, Miss Brass--a kind of amazon at common law, of whom it may be desirable to offer a brief description.
She was clay, after all, mere clay, subject to the common law of clay as his clay was subject, or anybody's clay.
full thirds = Old Monson's widow would under American common law receive a life interest in one-third of his real property, called a dower right, which would revert to his children if she died without remarrying.
I do think, Judge Temple, that such dangerous amusements should be suppressed, by statute; nay, I doubt whether they are not already indict able at common law.
Let me see,' said Mortimer, as they went along; 'I have been, Eugene, upon the honourable roll of solicitors of the High Court of Chancery, and attorneys at Common Law, five years; and--except gratuitously taking instructions, on an average once a fortnight, for the will of Lady Tippins who has nothing to leave--I have had no scrap of business but this romantic business.
Yet shall we not pretend that they were exempt from the common laws of mortality, or entirely free from all the errors of their age.
It was a Pope who said of Cellini to a conclave of Cardinals that common laws and common authority were not made for men such as he; but it was a Pope who thrust Cellini into prison, and kept him there till he sickened with rage, and created unreal visions for himself, and saw the gilded sun enter his room, and grew so enamoured of it that he sought to escape, and crept out from tower to tower, and falling through dizzy air at dawn, maimed himself, and was by a vine-dresser covered with vine leaves, and carried in a cart to one who, loving beautiful things, had care of him.
A key strength of the common law tradition, says Lord Goff in a lecture at the turn of the twenty-first century on the future of the common law, is the fact that we "can hear the voice of the individual judge speaking from the page.