great northern diver

(redirected from common loons)
Related to common loons: Gavia immer

great northern diver

n
(Animals) a large northern bird, Gavia immer, with a black-and-white chequered back and a black head and neck in summer: family Gaviidae (divers)
Translations
Eistaucher

great northern diver

n (Zool) → tuffatore m dei ghiacci
References in periodicals archive ?
Common loons and glaucous-winged gulls were observed at two lakes with two-spined stickleback and red-throated loons and glaucous-winged gulls were observed at one lake with four-spined stickleback.
Since common loons (Gavia immer) are at the top of the aquatic food web and live 20-30 years, they can be significantly impacted by accumulation of mercury in their bodies.
A model using Hg burdens among free-living Common Loons (Gavia immer) in highly polluted areas of eastern North America found that lig was likely having an impact on local loon populations by lowering their reproductive efforts (Meyer, 2005).
Wildlife biologists have determined that Quabbin Reservoir is home to half of the nesting population of common loons in the state.
Due to the magnitude of this event, the WCNC facility was quickly overwhelmed by hundreds of collected seabirds, which included Common Loons (Gavia immer), Common Murres (Uria aalge), Pacific Loons (G.
The things people see are common loons, American black ducks, common mergansers, common golden eyes, and ring-necked ducks.
In their travels the Blues see snowy egrets, great blue herons, laughing gulls, roseate terns, Atlantic puffins, American oystercatchers, magnificent frigate birds, sandpipers, Brandt's cormorant, brown pelicans, winter wrens, thick-billed immures, and common loons.
Evers of the BioDiversity Research Institute in Gorham, Maine, and his colleagues analyzed mercury concentrations in yellow perch and common loons in the northern United States and southern Canada.
Wild common loons (Gavia immer) were captured across much of their southern North American range.
Bioaccumulation of mercury in yellow perch (Perca flavenscens) and common loons (Gavia immer) in relation to lake chemistry in Atlantic Canada.
The center has documented weight loss and death in common loons resulting from mercury poisoning, which comes from local sources and arrives via aerial transportation.
He has conducted evolutionary genetic research on common loons (Gavia immer), field studies of loon behavior in Wisconsin, Michigan, Alaska and Scotland, and has worked on the population genetics of the threatened harpy eagle (Harpia harpyja).