common prayer

Related to common prayer: prayer book

common prayer

n
(Anglicanism) the liturgy of public services of the Church of England, esp Morning and Evening Prayer
References in classic literature ?
"The book of Common Prayer is the composition of men like ourselves.
He had no fixed belief, but he went to the service of his church whenever it was held among us, and he revered the Book of Common Prayer while he disputed the authority of the Bible with all comers.
The Book of Common Prayer, now used in the English Church coordinately with Bible and Psalter, took shape out of previous primers of private devotion, litanies, and hymns, mainly as the work of Archbishop Cranmer during the reign of Edward VI.
Vandenhuten received her, and seated her beside himself; we drove all together to the Protestant chapel, went through a certain service in the Common Prayer Book, and she and I came out married.
The church's governing body, the General Synod, approved nearly unanimously on July 16 the measure to replace the conversion prayer in the Book of Common Prayer with another entitled "For Reconciliation with the Jews."
1549: The Church of England adopted The Book of Common Prayer compiled by Thomas Cranmer.
Chris Dow, a priest in the diocese of Toronto and member of the Prayer Book Society of Canada (PBSC), learned about a movement to delete the "prayer for the conversion of the Jews" from the Book of Common Prayer, he thought to himself, "It would be a shame to just see the old prayer deleted."
Article 28(1) says:"No religious instruction shall be provided in any educational institution wholly maintained out of state funds." Article 19(1)(a) says:"All citizens shall have the right to freedom of speech and expression."Shah contended that the common prayer is a"religious instruction"within the meaning of Article 28 of the Constitution and should be prohibited.
Refuting the view that the address was crafted with traditional classical references, "Lincoln's Gettysburg Address: Echoes of the Bible and Book of Common Prayer" by the late professor of law and literature A.
In the nearly 40 years since the advent of the 1979 Book of Common Prayer, the re-translation of the Psalter created for that book has become a standard, used not only by Episcopalians, but adopted by others into their own worship service books and liturgies.
A BOOK of Common Prayer from 1666 has been returned to a library after being stolen in the 1800s.
Gibbons's analysis of the 1559 Book of Common Prayer liturgies for the Communion and burial rites provides the historical and cultural foundation for his readings of the poems, which he discusses in individual chapters on Spenser's elegies, Southwell's lyric verse, Donne's divine poems, Herbert's The Temple, and Crashaws English lyrics.