commonalty


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com·mon·al·ty

 (kŏm′ə-nəl-tē)
n. pl. com·mon·al·ties
1. The common people as opposed to the upper classes. Also called commonality.
2. An incorporated body; a corporation.
3. An entire group: the commonalty of laypeople.

[Middle English communalte, from Old French comunalte, from Medieval Latin commūnālitās, from Late Latin commūnālis, of the community; see communal.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

commonalty

(ˈkɒmənəltɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the ordinary people as distinct from those with authority, rank, or title, esp when considered as a political and social unit or estate of the realm. Compare third estate
2. (Law) the members of an incorporated society
[C13: from Old French comunalte, from comunal communal]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

com•mon•al•ty

(ˈkɒm ə nl ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the common people, as distinguished from those with authority, rank, station, or the like.
2. an incorporated body or its members.
[1250–1300; Middle English comunalte, communaute < Old French, =communau–, comunal- communal]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Commonalty, Commonty

 the community; the common people; the corporate body of a town or city.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commonalty - a class composed of persons lacking clerical or noble rank
social class, socio-economic class, stratum, class - people having the same social, economic, or educational status; "the working class"; "an emerging professional class"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

commonalty

noun
The common people:
common (used in plural), commonality, commoner (used in plural), crowd, hoi polloi, mass (used in plural), mob, pleb (used in plural), plebeian (used in plural), populace, public, ruck, third estate.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

commonalty

n (form) the commonaltydie Bürgerlichen pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
By this means he says he shall necessarily have an equal number of each rank, but he is mistaken--for the majority will always consist of those of the first rank, and the most considerable people; and for this reason, that many of the commonalty not being obliged to it, will not attend the elections.
In much the same way do the commonalty lead their leaders in many other things, at the same time that the leaders little suspect it.
Yes, I made various acquaintances in the hamlet and a thing that gratified me a good deal was to find our new coins in circulation -- lots of milrays, lots of mills, lots of cents, a good many nickels, and some silver; all this among the artisans and commonalty generally; yes, and even some gold -- but that was at the bank, that is to say, the goldsmith's.
There was sufficient divergence of type, as well as of individual beauty, to allow of fair comment; Lady Arabella represented the aristocratic type, and Lilla that of the commonalty.
For removing discontentments, or at least the danger of them; there is in every state (as we know) two portions of subjects; the noblesse and the commonalty. When one of these is discontent, the danger is not great; for common people are of slow motion, if they be not excited by the greater sort; and the greater sort are of small strength, except the multitude be apt, and ready to move of themselves.
The Gardens are a tremendous big place, with millions and hundreds of trees, and first you come to the Figs, but you scorn to loiter there, for the Figs is the resort of superior little persons, who are forbidden to mix with the commonalty, and is so named, according to legend, because they dress in full fig.
Moreover, these gentry who lead snug lives in government offices may talk and talk, but their words are not good to eat, so I have come back here again to draw my pay out of the commonalty," he said, striking the mud with his spade.