commoner


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com·mon·er

 (kŏm′ə-nər)
n.
1. One of the common people.
2. A person without noble rank or title.

commoner

(ˈkɒmənə)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who does not belong to the nobility
2. (Law) a person who has a right in or over common land jointly with another or others
3. (Education) Brit a student at a university or other institution who is not on a scholarship

com•mon•er

(ˈkɒm ə nər)

n.
1. a member of the commonalty; a person without a title of nobility.
2. (at Oxford and some other British universities) a person who pays for his or her commons and other expenses and is not on a scholarship.
[1275–1325]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commoner - a person who holds no titlecommoner - a person who holds no title    
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
bourgeois, burgher - a member of the middle class
nobody, nonentity, cypher, cipher - a person of no influence
everyman - the ordinary person
Joe Bloggs, Joe Blow, John Doe, man in the street - a hypothetical average man
layman, layperson, secular - someone who is not a clergyman or a professional person
pleb, plebeian - one of the common people
prole, proletarian, worker - a member of the working class (not necessarily employed); "workers of the world--unite!"
rustic - an unsophisticated country person

commoner

noun
The common people.Used in plural:
common (used in plural), commonality, commonalty, crowd, hoi polloi, mass (used in plural), mob, pleb (used in plural), plebeian (used in plural), populace, public, ruck, third estate.
Translations
شَخْصٌ من عامَّة الشَّعْب
prostý občan
borgerlig
közember
alòÿîumaîur
prostý občan
halktan kişisıradan vatandaş

commoner

[ˈkɒmənəʳ] N
1. (= not noble) → plebeyo/a m/f
2. (at Oxford Univ etc) → estudiante mf que no tiene beca del colegio

commoner

[ˈkɒmənər] nroturier/ière m/fcommon ground n (fig)terrain m d'ententecommon land nterrain m communalcommon law ndroit m coutumiercommon-law husband [ˌkɒmənlɔːˈhʌzbənd] nconcubin mcommon-law wife [ˌkɒmənlɔːˈwaɪf] nconcubine f

commoner

n
Bürgerliche(r) mf
(Brit, Univ) Student, der kein Universitätsstipendium erhält

commoner

[ˈkɒmənəʳ] ncittadino/a (non nobile)

common

(ˈkomən) adjective
1. seen or happening often; quite normal or usual. a common occurrence; These birds are not so common nowadays.
2. belonging equally to, or shared by, more than one. This knowledge is common to all of us; We share a common language.
3. publicly owned. common property.
4. coarse or impolite. She uses some very common expressions.
5. of ordinary, not high, social rank. the common people.
6. of a noun, not beginning with a capital letter (except at the beginning of a sentence). The house is empty.
noun
(a piece of) public land for everyone to use, with few or no buildings. the village common.
ˈcommoner noun
a person who is not of high rank. The royal princess married a commoner.
common knowledge
something known to everyone or to most people. Surely you know that already – it's common knowledge.
common ˈlaw noun
a system of unwritten laws based on old customs and on judges' earlier decisions.
ˈcommon-law adjective
referring to a relationship between two people who are not officially married, but have the same rights as husband and wife. a common-law marriage; a common-law wife/husband.
ˈcommonplace adjective
very ordinary and uninteresting. commonplace remarks.
ˈcommon-room noun
in a college, school etc a sitting-room for the use of a group.
common sense
practical good sense. If he has any common sense he'll change jobs.
the Common Market
(formerly) an association of certain European countries to establish free trade (without duty, tariffs etc) among them, now replaced by the European Union.
the (House of) Commons
the lower house of the British parliament.
in common
(of interests, attitudes, characteristics etc) shared or alike. They have nothing in common – I don't know why they're getting married.
References in classic literature ?
But then the Church came to the front, with an axe to grind; and she was wise, subtle, and knew more than one way to skin a cat -- or a nation; she invented "divine right of kings," and propped it all around, brick by brick, with the Beatitudes -- wrenching them from their good purpose to make them fortify an evil one; she preached (to the commoner) humility, obedience to superiors, the beauty of self-sacrifice; she preached
(still to the commoner, always to the commoner) pa- tience, meanness of spirit, non-resistance under op- pression; and she introduced heritable ranks and aristocracies, and taught all the Christian populations of the earth to bow down to them and worship them.
The duel with knives in a dark room was once a commoner feature of Southwestern life than it is likely to be again.
Our conversations have, I think, made sufficiently clear to you the tenor of my life and purposes: a tenor unsuited, I am aware, to the commoner order of minds.
Every land hath indeed its ways and manners; but I promise you, Edward, that when you are my guest in Toledo or Madrid you shall not yearn in vain for any commoner's daughter on whom you may deign to cast your eye."
Sir Pitt Crawley (named after the great Commoner) was the son of Walpole Crawley, first Baronet, of the Tape and Sealing-Wax Office in the reign of George II., when he was impeached for peculation, as were a great number of other honest gentlemen of those days; and Walpole Crawley was, as need scarcely be said, son of John Churchill Crawley, named after the celebrated military commander of the reign of Queen Anne.
Harris believed that milk-teeth are commoner in men's mouths than those "doubled-up haves." [1]
I was not averse to doing this, as it served to make me and my boat a commoner incident among the water-side people there.
But Sancho did not so fully approve of his master's admonition as to let it pass without saying in reply, "Senor, I am a man of peace, meek and quiet, and I can put up with any affront because I have a wife and children to support and bring up; so let it be likewise a hint to your worship, as it cannot be a mandate, that on no account will I draw sword either against clown or against knight, and that here before God I forgive the insults that have been offered me, whether they have been, are, or shall be offered me by high or low, rich or poor, noble or commoner, not excepting any rank or condition whatsoever."
At this time, in which men, all created equal by God, were divided, thanks to prejudices, into two distinct castes, the gentleman and the commoner, as they are really divided into two races, the black and the white, -- at this time, we say, he whose portrait we have just sketched could not fail of being taken for a gentleman, and of the best class.
A sizar's life was not always a happy one, for many of the other scholars or gentlemen commoners looked down upon them because of their poverty.
The one can confer no privileges whatever; the other can make denizens of aliens, noblemen of commoners; can erect corporations with all the rights incident to corporate bodies.