commonly


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com·mon

 (kŏm′ən)
adj. com·mon·er, com·mon·est
1.
a. Belonging equally to or shared equally by two or more; joint: common interests.
b. Of or relating to the community as a whole; public: for the common good.
2. Widespread; prevalent: Gas stations became common as the use of cars grew.
3.
a. Occurring frequently or habitually; usual: It is common for movies to last 90 minutes or more.
b. Most widely known; ordinary: the common housefly.
4. Having no special designation, status, or rank: a common sailor.
5.
a. Not distinguished by superior or noteworthy characteristics; average: the common spectator.
b. Of no special quality; standard: common procedure.
c. Of mediocre or inferior quality; second-rate: common cloth.
6. Unrefined or coarse in manner; vulgar: behavior that branded him as common.
7. Grammar
a. Either masculine or feminine in gender.
b. Representing one or all of the members of a class; not designating a unique entity.
n.
1. commons The common people; commonalty.
2. commons(used with a sing. or pl. verb)
a. The social class composed of commoners.
b. The parliamentary representatives of this class.
3. Commons The House of Commons.
4. A tract of land, usually in a centrally located spot, belonging to or used by a community as a whole: a band concert on the village common.
5. The legal right of a person to use the lands or waters of another, as for fishing.
6. commons(used with a sing. verb) A building or hall for dining, typically at a university or college.
7. Common stock.
8. Ecclesiastical A service used for a particular class of festivals.
Idiom:
in common
Equally with or by all.

[Middle English commune, from Old French commun, from Latin commūnis; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]

com′mon·ly adv.
com′mon·ness n.
Synonyms: common, ordinary, familiar
These adjectives describe what is generally known or frequently encountered. Common applies to what takes place often, is widely used, or is well known: The botanist studied the common dandelion. The term also implies coarseness or a lack of distinction: My wallet was stolen by a common thief. Ordinary describes something usual that is indistinguishable from others, sometimes derogatorily: "His neighbors were all climbing into their cars and trucks and heading off to work as if nothing miraculous had happened and this were just another ordinary day" (Steve Yarbrough).
Familiar applies to what is well known or quickly recognized: Most children can recite familiar nursery rhymes. See Also Synonyms at general.

commonly

(ˈkɒmənlɪ)
adv
1. usually; ordinarily: he was commonly known as Joe.
2. derogatory in a coarse or vulgar way: she dresses commonly.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.commonly - under normal conditions; "usually she was late"

commonly

adverb
In an expected or customary manner; for the most part:
Idioms: as usual, per usual.
Translations

commonly

[ˈkɒmənlɪ] ADV
1. (= usually, frequently) [called] → comúnmente; [prescribed] → frecuentemente
more commonly known asmás comúnmente conocido como ...
anorexia is more commonly found among womenla anorexia es más común or corriente entre las mujeres
an orchid which is not commonly found in this countryuna orquídea que no es corriente encontrar or que no se encuentra frecuentemente en este país
it is commonly the case thates corriente que ..., frecuentemente se da el caso de que ...
acupuncture is commonly used in Chinala acupuntura es una práctica muy común en China
2. (= generally) the commonly held viewla opinión extendida or generalizada
it is commonly accepted as the best in the worldes aceptado por todos como el mejor del mundo
it is commonly believed thates una creencia extendida or generalizada que ...
the disease is commonly thought to be caused by a viruses una creencia extendida or generalizada que esta enfermedad está causada por un virus
3. (= vulgarly) [behave, speak, dress] → ordinariamente, vulgarmente

commonly

[ˈkɒmənli] adv
(= often) [used] → communément, généralement; [found] → fréquemment
to be commonly associated with sth → être fréquemment associé(e) à qch
(in layman's terms) [called] → couramment; [known as] → généralementCommon Market n (formerly, in Europe) the Common Market → le Marché communcommon market n (= trade organization) → marché m communcommon-or-garden common or garden [ˌkɒmənərˈgɑːrdən] adj (mainly British)ordinaire

commonly

adv
(= often)häufig; (= widely)gemeinhin, weithin; a commonly held beliefeine weitverbreitete or weit verbreitete Ansicht; it is commonly believed that …es wird allgemein angenommen, dass …; (more) commonly known as …besser bekannt als …
(= vulgarly)gewöhnlich, ordinär

commonly

[ˈkɒmənlɪ] adv (see adj) → comunemente, usualmente, in modo volgare
References in classic literature ?
No man ever stood the lower in my estimation for having a patch in his clothes; yet I am sure that there is greater anxiety, commonly, to have fashionable, or at least clean and unpatched clothes, than to have a sound conscience.
He adds that they were commonly carpeted and lined within with well-wrought embroidered mats, and were furnished with various utensils.
I have tried to expose to the view of the public more distinctly than is commonly done, one of the characters of the recent past.
In war, he is daring, boastful, cunning, ruthless, self-denying, and self-devoted; in peace, just, generous, hospitable, revengeful, superstitious, modest, and commonly chaste.
Thus, the term used in the title of this book has undergone the changes of Mahicanni, Mohicans, and Mohegans; the latter being the word commonly used by the whites.
As for talkers and futile persons, they are commonly vain and credulous withal.
The first, that simulation and dissimulation commonly carry with them a show of fearfulness, which in any business, doth spoil the feathers, of round flying up to the mark.
Such lawing also shall be done by the assize commonly used, and which is, that three claws shall be cut off without the ball of the right foot.
When the time for the young Prince's christening came the King chose as godmother a neighbouring Princess, so celebrated for her wisdom and goodness that she was commonly called 'the Good Queen.
Her hard rule made her very unpopular, and it was commonly believed that she had made away with Prince Alphege.
Independent of this motive of sympathy, if a large and influential State should happen to be the aggressing member, it would commonly have weight enough with its neighbors to win over some of them as associates to its cause.
When they happen, they commonly amount to revolutions and dismemberments of empire.