commotion

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com·mo·tion

 (kə-mō′shən)
n.
1. A condition of turbulent motion.
2.
a. An agitated disturbance; a hubbub: heard a commotion in the hall.
b. Civil disturbance or insurrection; disorder.

[Middle English commocioun, from Old French commotion, from Latin commōtiō, commōtiōn-, from commōtus, past participle of commovēre, to disturb : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + movēre, to move; see meuə- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

commotion

(kəˈməʊʃən)
n
1. violent disturbance; upheaval
2. (Law) political insurrection; disorder
3. a confused noise; din
[C15: from Latin commōtiō, from commovēre to throw into disorder, from com- (intensive) + movēre to move]
comˈmotional adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

com•mo•tion

(kəˈmoʊ ʃən)

n.
1. violent or tumultuous action or activity; agitation; noisy disturbance.
2. political or social disturbance or upheaval.
[1520–30; < Latin commōtiō <commovēre (see commove)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commotion - a disorderly outburst or tumult; "they were amazed by the furious disturbance they had caused"
disorder - a disturbance of the peace or of public order
turmoil, upheaval, convulsion - a violent disturbance; "the convulsions of the stock market"
earthquake - a disturbance that is extremely disruptive; "selling the company caused an earthquake among the employees"
incident - a public disturbance; "the police investigated an incident at the bus station"
stir, splash - a prominent or sensational but short-lived news event; "he made a great splash and then disappeared"
tempest, storm - a violent commotion or disturbance; "the storms that had characterized their relationship had died away"; "it was only a tempest in a teapot"
storm center, storm centre - a center of trouble or disturbance
garboil, tumult, tumultuousness, uproar - a state of commotion and noise and confusion
2.commotion - the act of making a noisy disturbancecommotion - the act of making a noisy disturbance
disturbance - the act of disturbing something or someone; setting something in motion
ado, bustle, flurry, hustle, stir, fuss - a rapid active commotion
3.commotion - confused movement; "he was caught up in a whirl of work"; "a commotion of people fought for the exits"
motion, movement - a natural event that involves a change in the position or location of something
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

commotion

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

commotion

noun
1. The condition of being physically agitated:
2. An interruption of regular procedure or of public peace:
Informal: flap, to-do.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
هِياج، اضْطِراب، شَغَب
аларма
rozruch
opstandelsepostyr
læti; ólga
sumaištis
kņadanemierssatraukums

commotion

[kəˈməʊʃən] N (= noise) → alboroto m; (= activity) → jaleo m, tumulto m, confusión f; (civil) → disturbio m
to cause a commotionprovocar or causar un alboroto
to make a commotion (= noise) → armar un alboroto; (= fuss) → armar un lío
there was a commotion in the crowdse armó un lío entre los espectadores
what a commotion!¡qué alboroto!
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

commotion

[kəˈməʊʃən] ndésordre m, tumulte m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

commotion

nAufregung f usu no indef art; (= noise)Lärm m, → Spektakel m; to cause a commotionAufsehen erregen; to make a commotionTheater machen (inf); (= noise)Krach machen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

commotion

[kəˈməʊʃn] nconfusione f, tumulto, trambusto
to make or cause a commotion → causare confusione
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

commotion

(kəˈməuʃən) noun
(a) confused, noisy uproar. He was woken by a commotion in the street.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

commotion

n. conmoción; agitación.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
These civil commotions were constantly fomented by the monarchs of Blefuscu; and when they were quelled, the exiles always fled for refuge to that empire.
And this precaution is no more than necessary for a prince every year engaged either in foreign wars or intestine commotions. These towns have each a governor, whom they call gadare, over whom is the educ, or lieutenant, and both accountable to an officer called the afamacon, or mouth of the King; because he receives the revenues, which he pays into the hands of the relatinafala, or grand master of the household: sometimes the Emperor creates a ratz, or viceroy, general over all the empire, who is superior to all his other officers.
It appears that Massachusetts found it necessary to raise troops for repressing the disorders within that State; that Pennsylvania, from the mere apprehension of commotions among a part of her citizens, has thought proper to have recourse to the same measure.
But without entering into any particulars concerning actions for murder, and those wherein strangers are the parties, let us particularly treat of those courts which have the jurisdiction of those matters which more particularly relate to the affairs of the community and which if not well conducted occasion seditions and commotions in the state.
He was aware that these battalions with their commotions were woven red and startling into the gentle fabric of softened greens and browns.
-- let us conceal ourselves in the arch of this aqueduct, and I will inform you presently of the origin of the commotion. It has turned out as I have been anticipating.
'What can that commotion be by the pigsties?' asked the Emperor, who was standing on the balcony.
"Here you are," he went on, "taking poor Gouvernail seriously and making a commotion over him, the last thing he would desire or expect."
The Frogs were frightened out of their lives by the commotion made in their midst, and all rushed to the bank to look at the horrible monster; but after a time, seeing that it did not move, one or two of the boldest of them ventured out towards the Log, and even dared to touch it; still it did not move.
Stripped to our shirts and drawers, we sprang to the white-ash, and after several hours' pulling were almost disposed to renounce the chase, when a general pausing commotion among the whales gave animating token that they were now at last under the influence of that strange perplexity of inert irresolution, which, when the fishermen perceive it in the whale, they say he is gallied.
'And even should they consent,' said Toby, 'they would only produce a commotion in the valley, in which we might both be sacrificed by these ferocious islanders.' This was unanswerable; but still I clung to the belief that he might succeed in accomplishing the other part of my plan; and at last I overcame his scruples, and he agreed to make the attempt.
Instantly all was commotion. The Sperm Whale blows as a clock ticks, with the same undeviating and reliable uniformity.