companionate marriage

companionate marriage

n.
A marriage based on the mutual consent and equality of the partners for the purpose of companionship rather than with the expectation of child-rearing or financial support.

compan′ionate mar′riage


n.
a proposed form of marriage permitting the divorce of a childless couple by mutual consent, leaving neither spouse responsible for the financial welfare of the other.
[1925]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In this new biography, Ireland explores eighteenth-century transatlantic relationships, companionate marriage, and more through his examination of one fascinating woman.
In effect, Mapu installs the novel idea that is also central in Watt: the shift from marriages of interest to so-called companionate marriage. But what is fascinating about Seidman's account comes when she departs from Watt precisely where Jewish modernity refuses to follow the pattern of the eighteenth-century British model or the clean sweep suggested by its nineteenth-century Jewish equivalent.
Such plays are cautionary tales, demonstrating how the ideal companionate marriage celebrated in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century domestic advice tracts could crumble, exposing unfaithful wives, ambitious servants, lying friends and clueless husbands.
Fielding's decision not to marry is very significant in a novel in which the notion of companionate marriage is celebrated through the union of Mr.
Levy-Navarro similarly analyzes the queer potential of Venus's large body, arguing that Venus "gives free reign [sic] to her appetites in a way that will be perceived as dangerous to those who value a companionate marriage that requires that the appetites be moderated and contained within an increasingly more affectively and erotically demanding bond between husband and wife ...
Schaffer confronts the now-rote story of companionate marriage to question whether an emphasis on stranger-love formed romantic ideals for the early Victorians.
For nineteenth-century Janeites, literature was an object of domestic, habitual love, modeled on the felicitous companionate marriage that the reader may imagine to follow the denouement (or rather, nouement) of an Austen courtship plot.
Turning from questions of slavery to Native American activism, Sarah Robbins examines the growth and dissolution of the literary partnership of Elaine Goodman Eastman with her husband Charles Eastman, suggesting that the pair's shared pedagogical investments in educating Euro-Americans about Native American culture were damaged by the constraints of companionate marriage and by Charles' increasing popularity and his lack of support of his wife's literary goals.
Parents often made arranged marriages for children, though this was becoming less true by 1700 as young people began to want choice in selecting a spouse and to prefer "Companionate Marriage," as Stone defines it, in The Family, Sex and Marriage in England 1500-1800.
Each marriage negotiation between two generations also "brings into direct competition two social and legal orders--one feudal and patriarchal in its assertion of kinship, the other mercantile and negotiative in pursuit of individual desires" (3), and the triumph of a manipulative and materially self-interested younger generation marks a cultural move toward individual choice and companionate marriage. Though the individualistic younger generation apparently "wins" in the comedic resolutions, Bunker finally argues that the plays do not wholly embrace these new value systems and that relations between generations as well as the landed gentry and the rising merchant class remain in flux.
250 CE), defined marriage as "the joining of a husband and wife and a sharing of their whole fife, a union of divine and human law." Other evidence, from romances like Leucippe and Clitophon, The Ephesian Tale, and The History of Apollonius, Prince of Tyre, to the widespread erotic representations in Roman homes (notably the ubiquitous ceramic lamps that frequently depicted symplegmata, or sexual positions of every sort) argues for the flourishing of something like companionate marriage.
(3) Elinor clearly prefers Edward, and theirs is a companionate marriage. However, Elinor secures this marriage by remaining inactive; her reserve and patience preserve her from the debts of obligation or risk of failed exchange.