comparative psychology


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Related to comparative psychology: differential psychology

comparative psychology

n
(Psychology) the study of the similarities and differences in the behaviour of different species
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Noun1.comparative psychology - the branch of psychology concerned with the behavior of animals
psychological science, psychology - the science of mental life
References in periodicals archive ?
His theory synthesizes ideas from cognitive science, child development, human evolution, and comparative psychology to create a new framework for understanding the growth of the human mind and emotions in the first seven years of life.
De Waal also covers a wide-ranging survey of topics pertinent to comparative psychology, but clearly from the perspective of comparative cognition.
We first summarize evidence that illustrates the centrality of dance to human life indirectly from archaeology, comparative psychology, developmental psychology, and cross-cultural psychology.
He goes on to discuss how the methods of comparative psychology may be plausibly extended to test further hypotheses regarding selection pressures leading to capacities for mindreading and the like.
First, his book Intelligenzprufungen an Menschenaffen (1917) (2) detailed his experimental research on intelligence in anthropoid apes, and made him an eminent figure in comparative psychology in those years.
Carpenter is a senior scientist in the Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany.
"A California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus) Can Keep the Beat: Motor Entrainment to Rhythmic Auditory Stimuli in a Non Vocal Mimic." Journal of Comparative Psychology published online 1 April 2013.
Enviado para su publicacion al Journal of Comparative Psychology.
"Dogs' captive environment provides more stimuli that warrant barking," says Sophia Yin, DVM, MS, in her paper on "A New Perspective on Barking in Dogs," published in the Journal of Comparative Psychology. Wolves range about large, open areas while many dogs live in confined spaces, with frequent intruders like mail carriers, she says.

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