comparatively


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com·par·a·tive

 (kəm-păr′ə-tĭv)
adj.
1.
a. Relating to, based on, or involving comparison.
b. Of or relating to the scientific or historical comparison of different phenomena, institutions, or objects, such as languages, legal systems, or anatomical structures, in an effort to understand their origins or relationships.
2. Estimated by comparison; relative: a comparative newcomer.
3. Grammar Of, relating to, or being the intermediate degree of comparison of adjectives, as better, sweeter, or more wonderful, or adverbs, as more softly.
n. Grammar
1. The comparative degree.
2. An adjective or adverb expressing the comparative degree.

com·par′a·tive·ly adv.
Our Living Language Speakers of vernacular dialects often use double comparatives and superlatives such as more higher and most fastest. Although such constructions may seem redundant or even illogical, standard and nonstandard varieties of all languages are replete with such constructions. In English the redundant comparative dates back to the 1500s. Prior to this, in Old and Middle English, suffixes, rather than a preceding more or most, almost always marked the comparative and superlative forms of adjectives and adverbs, regardless of word length. In the Early Modern English period (c. 1500-1800), more and most constructions became more common. The Modern English rule governing the distribution of -er/-est and more/most had not yet arisen, and such forms as eminenter, impudentest, and beautifullest occurred together with constructions like more near, most poor, and most foul. Double markings were commonly used to indicate special emphasis, and they do not appear to have been socially disfavored. Even Shakespeare used double comparatives and superlatives, as in Mark Antony's statement "This was the most unkindest cut of all" from Julius Caesar. Nowadays, although double comparatives and superlatives are not considered standard usage, they are kept alive in vernacular dialects. See Note at might2, plural
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.comparatively - in a relative manner; by comparison to something else; "the situation is relatively calm now"
Translations
بالمُقارَنَهنِسْبِياً
poměrně
forholdsvisforholdsvistnogenlunde
verraten
razmjerno
hlutfallslega, tiltölulega
比較的
비교적
jämförelsevis
ที่เปรียบเทียบได้
tương đối

comparatively

[kəmˈpærətɪvlɪ] ADV (= relatively) → relativamente; [consider, view] → desde un punto de vista relativo
the books can be studied comparativelyse puede hacer un estudio comparado de los libros

comparatively

[kəmˈpærətɪvli] adv (= relatively) → relativement

comparatively

adv
(= relatively)verhältnismäßig, relativ

comparatively

[kəmˈpærətɪvlɪ] adv (see adj) → relativamente, comparativamente

compare

(kəmˈpeə) verb
1. to put (things etc) side by side in order to see to what extent they are the same or different. If you compare his work with hers you will find hers more accurate; This is a good essay compared with your last one.
2. to describe as being similar to. She compared him to a monkey.
3. to be near in standard or quality. He just can't compare with Mozart.
comparable (ˈkompərəbl) adjective
of the same kind, on the same scale etc. The houses were not at all comparable in size.
comparative (kəmˈpӕrətiv) adjective
1. judged by comparing with something else. the comparative quiet of the suburbs.
2. (of an adjective or adverb used in comparisons) between positive and superlative, as the following underlined words. a bigger book; a better man; Blacker is a comparative adjective; (also noun) What is the comparative of `bad'?
comˈparatively adverb
This house was comparatively cheap.
comparison (kəmˈpӕrisn) noun
(an act of) comparing. There's no comparison between Beethoven and pop music; Living here is cheap in comparison with London.

compare with is used to bring out similarities and differences between two things of the same type: He compared his pen with mine and decided mine was better .
compare to is used when pointing out a similarity between two different things: Stars are often compared to diamonds .

comparatively

نِسْبِياً poměrně forholdsvis verhältnismäßig συγκριτικά comparativamente, relativamente verraten comparativement razmjerno relativamente 比較的 비교적 naar verhouding forholdsvis w porównaniu comparativamente сравнительно jämförelsevis ที่เปรียบเทียบได้ göreceli olarak tương đối 比较地
References in classic literature ?
But with this, neither the author nor the public have any other concern than as some observation is necessary upon those parts of the work which thirteen years have made comparatively obsolete.
I craved human companionship, and, coming off the poop, took my place by the side of the boatswain (a man whom I did not like) in a comparatively dry spot where at worst we had water only up to our knees.
You will say that that was in the comparatively barbarous times; that these are barbarous times too, because also, comparatively speaking, pins are stuck in even now; that though man has now learned to see more clearly than in barbarous ages, he is still far from having learnt to act as reason and science would dictate.
He was only temporarily detained for some comparatively trivial assault; but he gave everyone the impression of a man with a black past and a dangerous future.
I prompted our medical orator with a neat speech from behind the curtain; and I never heard such applause, from such a comparatively small audience, before in my life.
He is less polished, less insinuating than Mainwaring, and is comparatively deficient in the power of saying those delightful things which put one in good humour with oneself and all the world.
As soon as I reached comparatively level ground I urged my mount into a canter and continued this, where the going permitted, until, close upon dusk, I discovered the point where other tracks joined those of Powell.
Our progress, at first comparatively easy, became more and more difficult.
Accustomed to ease, and unequal to the struggles incident to an infant society, the affluent emigrant was barely enabled to maintain his own rank by the weight of his personal superiority and acquirements; but, the moment that his head was laid in the grave, his indolent and comparatively uneducated offspring were compelled to yield precedency to the more active energies of a class whose exertions had been stimulated by necessity.
Comparatively calm, Mistress Blythe, comparatively calm.
As the day approached when he was to leave her for a comparatively long stay, she grew melting and affectionate, remembering his many acts of consideration and his repeated expressions of an ardent attachment.
Ahab well knew that although his friends at home would think little of his entering a boat in certain comparatively harmless vicissitudes of the chase, for the sake of being near the scene of action and giving his orders in person, yet for Captain Ahab to have a boat actually apportioned to him as a regular headsman in the hunt --above all for Captain Ahab to be supplied with five extra men, as that same boat's crew, he well knew that such generous conceits never entered the heads of the owners of the Pequod.