compasses


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com·pass

 (kŭm′pəs, kŏm′-)
n.
1.
a. A device used to determine geographic direction, usually consisting of a magnetic needle or needles horizontally mounted or suspended and free to pivot until aligned with the earth's magnetic field.
b. Another device, such as a radio compass or a gyrocompass, used for determining geographic direction.
2. A V-shaped device for describing circles or circular arcs and for taking measurements, consisting of a pair of rigid, end-hinged legs, one of which is equipped with a pen, pencil, or other marker and the other with a sharp point providing a pivot about which the drawing leg is turned. Also called pair of compasses.
3. Awareness or understanding of one's purpose or objectives: "Lacking a coherent intellectual and moral commitment, [he] was forced to find his compass in personal experience" (Doris Kearns Goodwin).
4.
a. An enclosing line or boundary; a circumference: outside the compass of the fence. See Synonyms at circumference.
b. A restricted space or area: four huge crates within the compass of the elevator.
c. Range or scope, as of understanding, perception, or authority: The subject falls outside the compass of this study. See Synonyms at range.
5. Music See range.
tr.v. com·passed, com·pass·ing, com·pass·es
1. To make a circuit of; circle: The sailboat compassed the island.
2. To surround; encircle: The trees compass the grave.
3. To understand; comprehend: "God ... is too great a profundity to be compassed by human cerebration" (Flann O'Brian).
4.
a. To accomplish or bring about: "He compassed his end only by the exercise of gentle violence" (Henry James).
b. To gain or achieve: "She had compassed the high felicity of seeing the two men beautifully take to each another" (Henry James).
5. To scheme; plot: compass the death of the king.
adj.
Forming a curve.

[Middle English compas, circle, compass, from Old French, from compasser, to measure, from Vulgar Latin *compassāre, to pace off : Latin com-, com- + Latin passus, step; see pace1.]

com′pass·a·ble adj.
Translations

compasses

[ˈkʌmpəsɪz] npl (MATHEMATICS) (also pair of compasses) → compas m
References in periodicals archive ?
Many airports have a compass rose painted on the pavement for aligning compasses. Using adjusting screws and the compass rose for alignment, a technician can adjust the compass and its compensating magnets to minimize the deviation error (see sidebar below), which is caused by competing magnetic fields in the aircraft to which it's mounted.
Compasses were later made from iron needles which had been magnetised using a lodestone.
We use the same principles when making compasses today as people did when they were invented.
Compasses directed northward would have needles pointing southward.
If you're still navigating by your old aluminum magnetic compasses, NSNs 6605-00-151-5337 or 6605-00-846-7618, turn them in before you get lost.
But compasses have a major drawback for creating long-lasting maps.