compassion fatigue


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Related to compassion fatigue: burnout

compassion fatigue

n.
A jaded attitude on the part of a contributor toward appeals for donations or charitable aid.

compassion fatigue

n
the inability to react sympathetically to a crisis, disaster, etc, because of overexposure to previous crises, disasters, etc

compas′sion fatigue`


n.
a lack of sympathy for suffering, as a result of continuous exposure to those in need of aid.
[1980–85, Amer.]
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References in periodicals archive ?
A key element in protecting yourself from secondary trauma, compassion fatigue and burnout is to be explicitly clear about your motivations for doing this work.
This extra notation is helpful, considering that the public has been known to confuse burnout with compassion fatigue, a condition with similar symptoms that exists under far different circumstances.
It discusses the foundations, including historical perspectives on victimology, theories of victimization, the nature and extent of victimization, and trauma and recovery of victims; the criminal justice system and victim assistance in law enforcement, the courts, corrections, and juvenile justice, including restorative justice; the impact of crime on victims in the areas of child abuse and elder abuse, intimate partner violence, sexual victimization, and cybercrime; and new directions in victim assistance, including professionalism and ethics, compassion fatigue, barriers to services, multicultural competency issues, collaborative responses, and challenges like human trafficking victims and victims of terrorism.
Debrief in emergency departments to improve compassion fatigue and promote resiliency.
In a pediatric hospital like Children's, employees are at an even greater risk of compassion fatigue. No one imagines a child with a life altering injury or illness that will rob them of what one sees as a typical childhood.
Centerstone Clinical Manager Niki Grajewski will discuss compassion fatigue and vicarious trauma and how both affect the body and mind.
Even though these critical incident responders do not experience the trauma directly, their indirect exposure can often lead to compassion fatigue and burnout (Figley, 2002; Jacobson, 2012; Sabin-Farrell & Turpin, 2003; Sprang, Clark, & Whitt-Woosley, 2007), as well as inhibit them from effectively providing the assistance and care that is demanded by their profession (Boscarino, Figley, & Adams, 2004).
Compassion fatigue has recently become one of the most talked about topics in veterinary medicine.
Burnout and compassion fatigue are major reasons why nurses leave their jobs.
Over time, the stress of caring for another person can cause something called "compassion fatigue." This is a common condition that can make you feel irritable, isolated, depressed, angry or anxious.
Health identifying resources, working with patrons in crisis, compassion fatigue, etc.
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether spiritual intelligence and intrinsic motivation can act as antecedents to compassion fatigue. This study will prove useful to pastors who wish to lower the levels of burnout and secondary traumatic stress that stem from their work in ministry.