compatriot


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com·pa·tri·ot

 (kəm-pā′trē-ət, -ŏt′)
n.
1. A person from one's own country.
2. A colleague.

[French compatriote, from Late Latin compatriōta : Latin com-, com- + Late Latin patriōta, countryman; see patriot.]

com·pa′tri·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

compatriot

(kəmˈpætrɪət)
n
a person from one's own country
[C17: from French compatriote, from Late Latin compatriōta; see patriot]
comˌpatriˈotic adj
comˈpatriotism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

com•pa•tri•ot

(kəmˈpeɪ tri ət; esp. Brit. -ˈpæ-)

n.
1. a fellow countryman or countrywoman.
2. a colleague or companion; peer.
adj.
3. of the same country.
[1605–15; < Late Latin compatriōta. See com-, patriot]
com•pa`tri•ot′ic (-ˈɒt ɪk) adj.
com•pa′tri•ot•ism, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.compatriot - a person from your own country
national, subject - a person who owes allegiance to that nation; "a monarch has a duty to his subjects"
countryman - a man from your own country
countrywoman - a woman from your own country
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

compatriot

noun fellow countryman, countryman, fellow citizen He beat his compatriots in the final.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

compatriot

noun
A person who is from one's own country:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُواطِن، من نَفْس البَلَد
krajan
landsmand
compatriotacompatriotemaanmies
honfitárs
samlandi
tėvynainis
tautietis
landsmanlandsmaninna

compatriot

[kəmˈpætrɪət] Ncompatriota mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

compatriot

[kəmˈpætrɪət] n (= countryman) → compatriote mf
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

compatriot

nLandsmann m, → Landsmännin f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

compatriot

[kəmˈpætrɪət] ncompatriota m/f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

compatriot

(kəmˈpӕtriət) , ((American) -ˈpei-) noun
a fellow-countryman. Many of his compatriots were killed in the war.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
"Your success depends upon yourself; you can have a palace, also," said Bonaparte, watching his compatriot with a keen eye.
At this demand D'Artagnan gave his name very modestly, emphasized the title of compatriot, and begged the servant who had put the question to him to request a moment's audience of M.
I am delighted to meet a compatriot. Well, and what are we to do with this man?" he added, addressing himself to Pierre as to a brother.
"What a good deed you did yesterday to our poor compatriot!" said the princess.
The other treated him at once to an exciting beverage, and expatiated on the pleasure of meeting a compatriot in a foreign land; to hear him, you would have thought they had encountered in Central Africa.
Cropoli, in his character of a compatriot, was indulgent towards Pittrino, which was the name of the artist.
The "family," for the rest, consists altogether of our beloved compatriots, and of still more beloved Englanders.
"De Winter took us to the house of a Spaniard, who, he said, had become naturalized as an Englishman by the guineas of his new compatriots. What do you say to it, Aramis?"
Concino Concini, and his wife Galligai, who subsequently shone at the French court, sought to Italianize the fashion, and introduced some Florentine tailors; but Percerin, touched to the quick in his patriotism and his self-esteem, entirely defeated these foreigners, and that so well that Concino was the first to give up his compatriots, and held the French tailor in such esteem that he would never employ any other, and thus wore a doublet of his on the very day that Vitry blew out his brains with a pistol at the Pont du Louvre.
Whistler was an influence strong with the English and his compatriots, and the discerning collected Japanese prints.
So closely packed was the howling, cursing mob that no weapon could be wielded to advantage, and none of the Arabs dared use a firearm for fear of wounding one of his compatriots.
"As a matter of fact, I know very few of my compatriots over here.