compeer


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com·peer

 (kŏm′pîr′, kəm-pîr′)
n.
1. A person of equal status or rank; a peer.
2. A comrade, companion, or associate.

[Middle English comper, from Old French, from Latin compār, equal; see compare.]

compeer

(ˈkɒmpɪə)
n
1. a person of equal rank, status, or ability; peer
2. a companion or comrade
[C13: from Old French comper, from Medieval Latin compater godfather; see compadre]

com•peer

(kəmˈpɪər, ˈkɒm pɪər)

n.
1. an equal; peer; colleague.
2. close friend; comrade.
v.t.
3. Archaic. to be the equal of; match.
[1325–75; Middle English comper < Middle French. See com-, peer1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.compeer - a person who is of equal standing with another in a group
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
peer group - contemporaries of the same status
associate - a person who joins with others in some activity or endeavor; "he had to consult his associate before continuing"
coeval, contemporary - a person of nearly the same age as another
gangsta - (Black English) a member of a youth gang
backup man, fill-in, reliever, stand-in, backup, substitute, relief - someone who takes the place of another (as when things get dangerous or difficult); "the star had a stand-in for dangerous scenes"; "we need extra employees for summer fill-ins"
successor, replacement - a person who follows next in order; "he was President Lincoln's successor"
townsman - a person from the same town as yourself; "a fellow townsman"

compeer

noun
One that is very similar to another in rank or position:
References in classic literature ?
So spake th' Apostate Angel, though in pain, Vaunting aloud, but rackt with deep despare: And him thus answer'd soon his bold Compeer.
Thou wert right to give me knowledge of it,'' said the Grand Master; ``in our presence a Preceptor is but as a common compeer of our Order, who may not walk according to his own will, but to that of his Master even according to the text,
He felt a slight disappointment, however, when he saw that this place was already taken by a compeer named Mousqueton, and when Porthos signified to him that the state of his household, though great, would not support two servants, and that he must enter into the service of D'Artagnan.
Round went the busily revolving machinery, kept in motion by the scissor-grinder's foot, and wore away the hard steel against the hard stone, whence issued an intense and spiteful prolongation of a hiss as fierce as those emitted by Satan and his compeers in Pandemonium, though squeezed into smaller compass.
These primitive statesmen, therefore -- Bradstreet, Endicott, Dudley, Bellingham, and their compeers -- who were elevated to power by the early choice of the people, seem to have been not often brilliant, but distinguished by a ponderous sobriety, rather than activity of intellect.
Her corn-cake, in all its varieties of hoe-cake, dodgers, muffins, and other species too numerous to mention, was a sublime mystery to all less practised compounders; and she would shake her fat sides with honest pride and merriment, as she would narrate the fruitless efforts that one and another of her compeers had made to attain to her elevation.
Stryver, already fast shouldering his way to a large and lucrative practice, behind his compeers in this particular, any more than in the drier parts of the legal race.
As these worthy compeers were on their route to the frontier, they fell in with another expedition, likewise on its way to the mountains.
The partners from Montreal, however, were the lords of the ascendant; coming from the midst of luxurious and ostentatious life, they quite eclipsed their compeers from the woods, whose forms and faces had been battered and hardened by hard living and hard service, and whose garments and equipments were all the worse for wear.
Tess, like her compeers, soon discovered which of the cows had a preference for her style of manipulation, and her fingers having become delicate from the long domiciliary imprisonments to which she had subjected herself at intervals during the last two or three years, she would have been glad to meet the milchers' views in this respect.
In fact, he had it in his thought to tell her that she ought not to have received young Ladislaw in his absence: but he abstained, partly from the sense that it would be ungracious to bring a new complaint in the moment of her penitent acknowledgment, partly because he wanted to avoid further agitation of himself by speech, and partly because he was too proud to betray that jealousy of disposition which was not so exhausted on his scholarly compeers that there was none to spare in other directions.
Thus, the Doll-lady of distinction had wax limbs of perfect symmetry; but only she and her compeers.