competency

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com·pe·ten·cy

 (kŏm′pĭ-tən-sē)
n. pl. com·pe·ten·cies
1. Competence.
2. A skill or ability.

competency

(ˈkɒmpɪtənsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. (Law) law capacity to testify in a court of law; eligibility to be sworn
2. a less common word for competence1, competence2

com•pe•ten•cy

(ˈkɒm pɪ tən si)

n., pl. -cies.
competence.
[1585–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.competency - the quality of being adequately or well qualified physically and intellectually
fitness - the quality of being qualified
linguistic competence - (linguistics) a speaker's implicit, internalized knowledge of the rules of their language (contrasted with linguistic performance)
proficiency - the quality of having great facility and competence
ability - the quality of being able to perform; a quality that permits or facilitates achievement or accomplishment

competency

noun
1. Physical, mental, financial, or legal power to perform:
2. Law. Conferred power:
Translations
авторитетност
kompetencekompetens
kielitaito

competency

[ˈkɒmpɪtənsi] ncompétence f

competency

n (to make medical decisions) capacidad f (para tomar decisiones médicas)
References in periodicals archive ?
The federal government is migrating to a competency-based approach to hiring, which means that competencies must be included in job announcements (JOA) and used in JOA assessment questionnaires.
Competency mapping is a tool for mapping the competencies required for executing roles or jobs.
A portfolio of competencies demonstrates Intellitec Solutions' commitment towards focusing on in-demand, business solution areas, along with ensuring it can meet the evolving needs of customers due to market changes.
The first tools to support the 2014 Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals are now available online for free.
Since the 2008-2009 academic year, the schools there have been shifting from the traditional time-based model of crediting students for sitting in a seat and paying attention for about 180 days to a model that requires them to prove mastery of competencies.
In this changing environment, authors in human resource management (Dubios, Rothwell, Stern, & Kemp, 2004; Lawler, 1994; Lucia & Lepsinger, 1999) and specifically Extension organizations (Maddy, Niemann, Lindquist, & Bateman, 2002; Stone & Bieber, 1997) recommend competencies as powerful tools that can provide focus on individual behaviors that contribute the most to organizational success.
Board work will get more complex and sophisticated as health care reform unfolds, demanding new competencies of hospital trustees, executives and physician leaders.
The term of managerial competencies from our point of view should to be associated with second meaning.
The book covers various pertinent topics spread across 11 Chapters, namely- Concept of competency; Competency Mapping Process; Developing Competency models; Competency Identification; Competency Assessment; 360 degree feedback and its application in competency; assessment; Assessment Centre and its application in competency assessment; Applications of Competency Mapping; Commonly asked questions on Competency Mapping; Managerial Competencies with definitions; and Will and skill mapping of manual Workers.
The National Collaboration for Youth has established a common set of core competencies for paid and volunteer staff who work with youth.
Competencies are the set of such skills and abilities (technical as well as behavioural) which are required for desired level of performance.

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