completion


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Related to completion: practical completion

com·ple·tion

 (kəm-plē′shən)
n.
1. The act of completing or the state of being completed.
2. Football A forward pass that is caught in bounds by a receiver.

com•ple•tion

(kəmˈpli ʃən)

n.
1. the act of completing.
2. the state of being completed.
3. conclusion; fulfillment.
4. (in football) a forward pass caught by the intended receiver.
[1650–60; < Late Latin]

Completion

 

(See also CESSATION, CULMINATION, TERMINATION.)

go through-stitch To go through with; to finish or conclude; to follow through. This expression alluding to the work of a tailor was popular in the 17th century but is no longer heard today.

For when a man has once undertaken a business, let him go through-stitch with it. (The Pagan Prince, 1690)

in for a penny, in for a pound Once involved in a matter, however slightly, one must carry it through whatever the consequences. The metaphor comes from the monetary units of Great Britain: formerly, the penny was 1/12 of a shilling and the pound 20 shillings or 240 pence; since decimalization, the pound is 100 new pence.

sign off To complete or end a performance, project, or other matter; to terminate; to withdraw. In the 9th century and for several hundred years thereafter, a person could change his religious affiliation simply by “signing off,” i.e., by signing a legal paper that ended his membership in one religious organization and, if he so desired, enrolled him in another.

The revolution … broke up the State Church and gave to every man the liberty of “signing off” as it was called, to any denomination that pleased him. (Harriet Beecher Stowe, The Poganuc People, Their Loves and Lives, 1878)

Beginning in the late Middle Ages, sign off usually referred to a creditor’s releasing a debtor from financial obligation by “signing off,” i.e., by affixing his signature to a document to that effect. A contemporary variation that refers to this practice of canceling a debt or amortizing an asset is write off.

The company wrote off the loss as a bad debt. (Law Times, 1891)

Since the 1930s, sign-off (as a noun) most commonly applies to a radio or television station’s ending its broadcast day.

Because of the earlier sign-off required by the Federal Communications Commission … (ABC Radio, 1949)

tie up the loose ends To conclude or settle matters; to answer all questions and account for any seemingly superfluous details. Loose ends in this expression refers to the last bit of unfinished business, the apparently irrelevant or contradictory details of a plan, arrangement, project, etc. This figurative use may derive from the practice of tying the ends of thread that hang loose after a cloth is woven or a garment is knitted.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.completion - (American football) a successful forward pass in football
American football, American football game - a game played by two teams of 11 players on a rectangular field 100 yards long; teams try to get possession of the ball and advance it across the opponents goal line in a series of (running or passing) plays
maneuver, manoeuvre, play - a deliberate coordinated movement requiring dexterity and skill; "he made a great maneuver"; "the runner was out on a play by the shortstop"
2.completion - a concluding actioncompletion - a concluding action      
consummation - the act of bringing to completion or fruition
consummation - the completion of marriage by sexual intercourse
ending, termination, conclusion - the act of ending something; "the termination of the agreement"
finishing, finish - the act of finishing; "his best finish in a major tournament was third"; "the speaker's finishing was greeted with applause"
finalisation, finalization - the act of finalizing
follow-through - carrying some project or intention to full completion; "I appreciated his follow-through on his promise"
follow-through - the act of carrying a stroke to its natural completion; "his follow-through was straight down the line toward the target"; "squash can be dangerous if your opponent has a long follow-through"
graduation - the successful completion of a program of study

completion

completion

noun
Translations
إنْهاء، إتْمام
dokončenídokončování
færdiggørelsefuldførelse
loppupäätös
achèvementconditionnement d’un puitsexécutionfini
lok, lyktir
final
bitmetamamlanma

completion

[kəmˈpliːʃən]
A. Nfinalización f, terminación f, conclusión f
to be nearing completionestar a punto de finalizarse or terminarse or concluirseestar llegando a su finalización or conclusión
on completion of contractcuando se cumpla el contrato
B. CPD completion date N (Jur) (for work) → fecha f de cumplimiento; (in house-buying) → fecha de entrega (de llaves)

completion

[kəmˈpliːʃən] n
(= finishing) [project, task, building] → achèvement m
to be nearing completion → être presque terminé(e)
to be due for completion → devoir être terminé(e)
(= concluding, sealing) [sale, deal] → réalisation f
on completion of contract → à la signature du contrat completion datecompletion date n [house sale] → date f d'exécution du contrat

completion

n
(= finishing)Fertigstellung f; (of work also)Beendigung f; (of project, course, education)Abschluss m; (of prison sentence)Verbüßung f; to be near completionkurz vor dem Abschluss stehen; to bring something to completionetw zum Abschluss bringen; we need more people for the completion of the workwir brauchen noch mehr Leute, um die Arbeit zum Abschluss zu bringen; on completion of the courseam Ende or nach Abschluss des Kurses; on completion of the contract/salebei Vertrags-/Kaufabschluss; completion dateFertigstellungstermin m
(= making whole)Vervollständigung f; (of education, meal)Abrundung f; (of happiness etc)Vervollkommnung f
(= filling in: of form etc) → Ausfüllen nt

completion

[kəmˈpliːʃn] ncompletamento
to be nearing completion → essere in fase di completamento
on completion of contract → alla firma del contratto

complete

(kəmˈpliːt) adjective
1. whole; with nothing missing. a complete set of Shakespeare's plays.
2. thorough. My car needs a complete overhaul; a complete surprise.
3. finished. My picture will soon be complete.
verb
to finish; to make complete. When will he complete the job?; This stamp completes my collection.
comˈpletely adverb
I am not completely satisfied.
comˈpleteness noun
comˈpletion (-ʃən) noun
finishing or state of being finished. You will be paid on completion of the work.
References in classic literature ?
On the completion of their labors, a dispute arose as to which had made the most perfect work.
My programme was no drink in the morning; first drink- time came with the completion of my thousand words.
Clerval desired the intercourse of the men of genius and talent who flourished at this time, but this was with me a secondary object; I was principally occupied with the means of obtaining the information necessary for the completion of my promise and quickly availed myself of the letters of introduction that I had brought with me, addressed to the most distinguished natural philosophers.
WHEN the author of these little tales commenced them, it was her intention to form a short series of such stories as, it was hoped, might not be entirely without moral advantage; but unforeseen circumstances have prevented their completion, and, unwilling to delay the publication any longer, she commits them to the world in their present unfinished state, without any flattering anticipations of their reception.
The Cambridge History of English Literature,' now nearing completion in fourteen volumes (G.
For as in landscape gardening, a spire, cupola, monument, or tower of some sort, is deemed almost indispensable to the completion of the scene; so no face can be physiognomically in keeping without the elevated open-work belfry of the nose.
With the completion of the T`ang dynasty, it was my design to bring this work to conclusion.
She had found some acquaintance, had been so lucky too as to find in them the family of a most worthy old friend; and, as the completion of good fortune, had found these friends by no means so expensively dressed as herself.
There is then in all persons a natural impetus to associate with each other in this manner, and he who first founded civil society was the cause of the greatest good; for as by the completion of it man is the most excellent of all living beings, so without law and justice he would be the worst of all, for nothing is so difficult to subdue as injustice in arms: but these arms man is born with, namely, prudence and valour, which he may apply to the most opposite purposes, for he who abuses them will be the most wicked, the most cruel, the most lustful, and most gluttonous being imaginable; for justice is a political virtue, by the rules of it the state is regulated, and these rules are the criterion of what is right.
As the summer months advanced, the transformation of the Venetian palace into the modern hotel proceeded rapidly towards completion.
The cannon was then finished; there was no possible doubt as to its perfect completion.
We can only guess why the great design was abandoned; perhaps because Plato became sensible of some incongruity in a fictitious history, or because he had lost his interest in it, or because advancing years forbade the completion of it; and we may please ourselves with the fancy that had this imaginary narrative ever been finished, we should have found Plato himself sympathizing with the struggle for Hellenic independence, singing a hymn of triumph over Marathon and Salamis, perhaps making the reflection of Herodotus where he contemplates the growth of the Athenian empire--"How brave a thing is freedom of speech, which has made the Athenians so far exceed every other state of Hellas in greatness