completist

completist

(kəmˈpliːtɪst)
n
(Other Non-sporting Hobbies) a person with an obsessive interest in a subject: ardent John Wayne completists.

com•plet•ist

(kəmˈpli tɪst)
n.
a collector who attempts to collect an example of every item in a particular field.
[1950–55]
References in periodicals archive ?
If you're a completist, then, or have favourite shows on all the services, this is the one to go for.
Central to this interval-less recital was the Britten, Barley, well up to the demands of this completist farrago of cello techniques, performing with an individuality which bravely ignored the spirit of the work's dedicatee, Mstislav Rostropovich, which might have been looking over his shoulder.
The completist angle is important, too, the tantalizing--or is it nauseating?
It was driving the completist in me absolutely nuts.
Retired teacher Trevor Hall, 62, of South Gosforth, Newcastle, said: "I'm a Doctor Who fan, In fact I'd say I'm a completist.
The early work of a renowned author is typically a literary curiosity, the province of the completist or academic.
In the music game, he's what's known as a completist.
You don't have to be a John Wayne Gacy completist, a POW/MIA stalwart, a cult deprogrammer, or a child suffering from recovered memories of Satanic rape at the hands of your day care center trusties (to name just a few of the real and unreal bogeymen Jenkins drags out of history's dustbin) to appreciate Decade of Nightmares' argument that politics is often mass psychology by another name.
Against the Theorists and lesser Historians, Westfahl can give "the true nature and history of science fiction" (8) in large part because he uses a completist approach to define "genre" historically, sociologically, and nonproblematically: what Westfahl considers genres others might call literary movements or schools.
Few of the free-kicks they give away or the cards they collect with the single-minded zeal of a Panini completist are for spiteful fouls.
Celebrating the composer's centenary, this was an all-Britten programme, but completist compilations sometimes throw up chaff amongst the wheat, the chaff here being the over-long superficiality of the 1949 Wedding Anthem composed for a society wedding (for all his left-wing politics, how Britten loved to suck up to the Establishment) and the tedious Antiphon composed for St Michael's, Tenbury.
Bill Frisell's seminal Good Dog, Happy Man seems at first irrelevant, the kind of record that fills out some cobwebbed corner of your musical completist catalog.