complicitly


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complicitly

(kəmˈplɪsɪtlɪ)
adv
in a way that amounts to complicity
References in periodicals archive ?
Where else would a president, who laughed complicitly at the suggestion border patrol agents should shoot undocumented migrants, get away with a faux condemnation of racism and a plea for unity across the very population he polarised?
Sadly, religious leaders, Christians and Muslims alike, in most parts of Africa seem indifferent and complicitly docile in the face of catastrophe on such a large scale.
If "The Wolf of Wall Street" took flak in some quarters for complicitly reveling in the glossy moral bankruptcy of its otherwise loaded brokers, such an accusation is unlikely to be leveled against "Equity." Meera Menon's refreshingly female-skewed financial thriller proves that the women of Wall Street can be just as coldheartedly corrupt as the boys, but most viewers won't be remotely seduced by the pitiless pressure-cooker surroundings its drawn-faced characters inhabit.
For example, though Otacilia suffers emotionally in her marriage and even complicitly supports her husband's authority, the narrator notes: "Otacilia tinha um jeito particular de exasperar-se e talvez se vingar.
Significantly, Febles attends to formal concerns, exploring for example how a naturalist mode of description positions itself complicitly in a stable, controlling point of view akin to the very bourgeois order Zola pretends to unmask (44).
What is not sufficiently clear is whether stereotypes of Afro-Cubanness in the film function to denounce conceptions of race reaching back to the nineteenth century or whether the film complicitly perpetuates these stereotypes in the present.
Expression using her modes and forms meant new attempts at voicing what before has been silent, in ways that were not complicitly speaking against at the same time.
I don't want it to end." I smiled complicitly. "You are a blessing.
The courts acted complicitly by abandoning the principle of individual examination, agreeing to the wholesale arrest of suspects, and claiming these were "offenses specific to the times." In addition, minors were treated the same as adults, and some judges openly supported the war.
Mario Benedetti takes us to a place where we are forced to reflect not only on the issues facing both protagonists of this play but also on the dilemmas attached to permitting these actions to take place and choosing to allow them to exist (complicitly or incomplicitly).
Could it be, then, that when Derrida speaks of the production and guarantee of the Declaration's own signature, of its fully effective self-legitimating performance, and so on--generally, when he focuses on the invention of the signer by the signature (rather than the claim that there are only countersignatures)--he reads the Declaration a bit too immanently and complicitly? At these moments, does Derrida not read the Declaration from the point of view of the British Crown upon whom the operations of the Declaration have been effective, that is, from the point of view of the Crown as ideally posited or projected by the Declaration, thus through the (self-) depiction, and in a way, the self-projection of the Declaration?
While the film does not answer this question for us, it nonetheless suggests that to succumb to the prevailing ideology and anaesthetize oneself in a Muzak-saturated, saccharine-sweet semblance of reality is also to complicitly submit to the very conditions in which horror can breed.